Harlem Renaissance Re-Examined

By Victor A. Kramer; Robert A. Russ | Go to book overview

AFTERWORD

CAROLYN C. DENARD

Few periods in American literary history have been more widely remembered, re-evaluated, re-appraised, or re-examined than that period of intense literary and artistic creativity by Black writers in the 1920s called the Harlem Renaissance. The first such re-evaluation was the publication in 1971 of The Harlem Renaissance1 by noted historian Nathan Huggins. In this controversial study of the Renaissance, Huggins gave the first serious critical appraisal of the writers of the Renaissance and the impact of the social and cultural forces that converged in Harlem in the 1920s. While realizing its lasting merits to the future generations, Huggins criticized the writers of the Renaissance for not being sure enough of their own indigenous expressive culture--particularly the music--in the creation of the art of the Renaissance. Huggins summarized that the effort was mostly one that mimicked Whites rather than one that asserted an independent Black cultural identity.

Closely following Huggins's study was a collection of essays published in 1972 called the Harlem Renaissance Remembered2 edited by Arna Bontemps. Bontemps's review was initiated largely because of his own invaluable role as a participant in that movement. In this lively, informative collection, Bontemps and many notable scholars of the period tried to recapture the feelings, the mood, and the impact of the Renaissance: the excitement it engendered, the promise it offered to budding writers, and the good feeling that it left in the hearts and minds of many, like Bontemps, who participated in it.

A 1974 issue of Studies in the Literary Imagination, 3 edited by Victor A. Kramer--the germ of this current study--took a renewed look at the Renaissance. This collection, rather than having the first-hand flavor that characterized the Bontemps collection, took the more scholarly approach of looking at both

-375-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Harlem Renaissance Re-Examined
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 422

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.