Latin America and the Caribbean in the International System

By G. Pope Atkins | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
The first comprehensive work to apply foreign policy analysis to the processes of almost all of the regional states was Harold E. Davis, Larman C. Wilson, and others, Latin American Foreign Policies ( Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1975); it was followed by several comparative foreign policy analyses within conceptual frameworks: Gerhard Drekonja K. and Juan G. Tokatlian, eds., Teoría y práctica de la política exterior latinoamericana ( Bogotá: Universidad de los Andes, 1983); Elizabeth G. Ferris and Jennie K. Lincoln, eds., Latin American Foreign Policies: Global and Regional Dimensions ( Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1981); Jennie K. Lincoln and Elizabeth G. Ferris, eds., The Dynamics of Latin American Foreign Policies ( Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1984); Heraldo Muñoz and Joseph S. Tulchin, eds., Latin American Nations in World Politics, 2d ed. ( Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1996); Juan Carlos Puig, ed., América Latina: políticas exteriores comparadas ( Buenos Aires: Grupo Editor Latinoamerinano, 1984); and Luciano Tomassini, ed., Relaciones internacionales de la América Latina ( México: Fondo de Cultura Economica, 1981). Good histories of the subject are provided by Demetrio Boersner , Relaciones internacionales de América Latina: breve historia, 4th ed. ( Caracas: Nueva Sociedád, 1990); and Harold Eugene Davis, John J. Finan, and F. Taylor Peck, Latin American Diplomatic History: An Introduction ( Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1977). Highly useful are the thematic compilations by the Programa de Seguimiento de las Políticas Exteriores Latinoamericanas (PROSPEL), Anuario de políticas exteriores latinoamericanas (individual titles vary), comp. Heraldo Muñoz ( Buenos Aires: Grupo Editor Latinoamericano, 1985-1988; Caracas: Editorial Nueva Sociedad, 1989-1990). See also Roland H. Ebel, Raymond Taras , and James D. Cochrane, Political Culture and Foreign Policy in Latin America: Case Studies from the Circum-Caribbean ( Albany: State University of New York Press, 1991). On the foreign policies of the English-speaking states, see Jacqueline Anne Braveboy-Wagner, The Caribbean in World Affairs: The Foreign Policies of the English-Speaking States ( Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1986); Anthony T. Bryan and Andrés Serbín, eds., Distant Cousins: The Caribbean-Latin American Relationship ( New Brunswick, N.J.: Transaction, 1994); Michael Erisman , Pursuing Post-Dependency Politics: South-South Relations in the Caribbean ( Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 1992); Ivelaw Lloyd Griffith, The Quest for Security in the Caribbean: Problems and Promises in Subordinate States (Armonk, N.Y.: M. E. Sharpe, 1993); and Jorge Heine and Leslie F. Manigat, eds., The Caribbean and World Politics: Cross-Currents and Cleavages ( New York: Holmes and Meier, 1988). See also Hilbourne A. Watson, ed., The Caribbean in the Global Political Economy ( Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 1994).
2.
The most thorough general work on Latin American nationalism is by Arthur P. Whitaker and David C. Jordan, Nationalism in Contemporary Latin America ( New York: Free Press, 1966), which should be read with Whitaker later article, "The New Nationalism in Latin America," Review of Politics 35 ( January 1973): 77-90. Also important are books by Victor Alba, Nationalists Without Nations ( New York: Praeger, 1968); Gerhard Masur, Nationalism in Latin America ( New York: Macmillan, 1966); and readings collected and analyzed by Samuel L. Baily, ed., Nationalism in Latin America ( New York: Knopf, 1971).
3.
The following discussion identifies the main forms of nationalism stimulated by modernization, following certain of the categories posited by Whitaker and Jordan, Nationalism in Contemporary Latin America.
4.
See Isaac Cohen, "Economic Questions," in The United States and Latin America: Redefining U.S. Purposes in the Post-Cold War Era, ed. G. Pope Atkins ( Austin: Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, University of Texas, 1992); and Isaac Cohen, "A New LatinAmerican and Caribbean Nationalism,"

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