The Education-Jobs Gap: Underemployment or Economic Democracy

By D. W. Livingstone | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

I owe large debts to many who helped in the creation of the various parts of this study. The Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto (OISE/UT) and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) funded the surveys and case studies that provide some of the central empirical sources of evidence. The Department of Sociology and Equity Studies in Education (SESE) at OISE/ UT, as well as the Centre for the Study of Education and Work in SESE, provided a supportive environment in which to conduct these heretical inquiries. The students in the Education and Work graduate seminar and in the Learning and Work Thesis Workshop group in SESE have been especially helpful through conducting their own related interviews and their group discussions of the text. I am also grateful to the University of Saskatchewan for inviting me to present the 27th Annual Sorokin Lecture, and to the University of British Columbia for inviting me to participate in its Noted Scholar Program during 1996. Both universities offered ideal venues to try out the ideas more fully developed in the later chapters of the book.

The individuals who have contributed to the completion of this work are far too numerous to list here. Many colleagues commented on parts of the manuscript or provided useful reference material, including Sandra Acker, Paul Anisef, Ari Antikainen, Bob Bowd, Bob Connell, June Corman, Phil Corrigan, Kari Dehli, Tom Dunk, Don Fisher, Isabel Gibb, Andy Hargreaves, Ted Harvey, Richard Hillman, Alf Hunter, Harvey Krahn, Atsushi Makino, Meg Luxton, Uri Levitan, Peter Mayo, Greg MacLeod, Jim McCarter, Roxana Ng, Paul Olson, Norene Pupo, Herman Robers, Kjell Rubenson, Roger Simon, Alison Taylor, Alan Thomas, Dieter Timmermann, Allen Tough and Terry Wotherspoon. Jack Quarter and Wally Seccombe offered especially insightful detailed critiques. I gratefully acknowledge the gen

-xiv-

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The Education-Jobs Gap: Underemployment or Economic Democracy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables and Figures ix
  • Preface xii
  • Acknowledgements xiv
  • Introduction Reversing the Education-Jobs Optic 1
  • 1 - The Knowledge Society: Pyramids and Icebergs of Learning 12
  • Introduction 12
  • Concluding Remarks 51
  • 2 - The Many Faces of Underemployment 52
  • Introduction 52
  • Concluding Remarks 94
  • 3 - Voices from the Gap: Underemployment and Lifelong Learning 97
  • 3 Voices from the Gap: Underemployment and Lifelong Learning 97
  • Concluding Remarks 131
  • 4 - Debunking the Knowledge Economy": The Limits of Human Capital Theory" 133
  • Introduction 133
  • Concluding Remarks 170
  • 5 - Explaining the Gap: Conflicts Over Knowledge and Work 173
  • Introduction 173
  • Concluding Remarks 223
  • 6 - Bridging the Gap: Prospects for Work Reorganization in Advanced Capitalism 226
  • Introduction 226
  • Concluding Remarks 274
  • Endnotes 276
  • Glossary of Acronyms 298
  • Bibliography 299
  • Index 331
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