The Education-Jobs Gap: Underemployment or Economic Democracy

By D. W. Livingstone | Go to book overview

1
The Knowledge Society:
Pyramids and Icebergs of Learning

Miniaturized electronic technology and its major product, information, cannot be controlled. . . . Access to information has escalated beyond anything that could have been imagined a decade ago.

-- Knel-Paz 1995, 267, 269

Despite the spread of democracy and the rise of the working classes in America, the elite among us often are so indifferent to and illiterate about the folklore or folk cultures, that the folk world represents the equivalent of a low-frequency communication that seldom or never reaches their ears. Yet folk culture represents what has been the dominant world culture since humankind began. . . . If literacy is to be defined realistically, then it must include developing an awareness and appreciation of the activities and daily interests of most people most of the time in contemporary society. The problem of most people is not the lack of knowledge, but the question of how to manage the scope and intensity of information on a daily basis.

-- Browne 1992, 127, 179


INTRODUCTION

To live is to learn. Continual social learning is the most distinctive feature of human beings. We are born more helpless than most other species and then constantly socialized by ever more complex and sophisticated communications with other humans throughout our lives. The cumulative body of human knowledge has grown greatly as we have created many new means of collecting raw data, convert-

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The Education-Jobs Gap: Underemployment or Economic Democracy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables and Figures ix
  • Preface xii
  • Acknowledgements xiv
  • Introduction Reversing the Education-Jobs Optic 1
  • 1 - The Knowledge Society: Pyramids and Icebergs of Learning 12
  • Introduction 12
  • Concluding Remarks 51
  • 2 - The Many Faces of Underemployment 52
  • Introduction 52
  • Concluding Remarks 94
  • 3 - Voices from the Gap: Underemployment and Lifelong Learning 97
  • 3 Voices from the Gap: Underemployment and Lifelong Learning 97
  • Concluding Remarks 131
  • 4 - Debunking the Knowledge Economy": The Limits of Human Capital Theory" 133
  • Introduction 133
  • Concluding Remarks 170
  • 5 - Explaining the Gap: Conflicts Over Knowledge and Work 173
  • Introduction 173
  • Concluding Remarks 223
  • 6 - Bridging the Gap: Prospects for Work Reorganization in Advanced Capitalism 226
  • Introduction 226
  • Concluding Remarks 274
  • Endnotes 276
  • Glossary of Acronyms 298
  • Bibliography 299
  • Index 331
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