Pakistan, 1997

By Craig Baxter; Charles H. Kennedy | Go to book overview

executive may react and reduce the judiciary's weight in the matter of appointment of judges cannot be ignored. Such an outcome is indeed possible by modifying the interpretation of the word "consultation." Currently, the court interprets a "consultation" to be an exchange which must be "effective, meaningful, purposive, consensus-oriented, leaving no room for complaint of arbitrariness or unfair play." Furthermore, under the current understanding, "the opinion of the chief justice of Pakistan and the chief justice of a high court as to the fitness and suitability of a candidate for judgeship is entitled to be accepted in the absence of very sound reasons to be recorded by the president." A "consultation" could easily be redefined to mean the ascertainment of the views of the chief justices concerned as to the fitness or suitability of a candidate for judgeship. Such a prospect, however, at present seems remote because the judiciary today is riding on the crest of popular acclaim and appears well set to succeed in its quest for the independencene needed to fulfill its mission as a "bastion of justice" for the common man.


Notes
1.
C.M.L.A. Order no. 1 of 1981.
2.
Benazir Bhutto v. Federation of Pakistan and another PLD 1988 S.C. 416.
3.
Federation of Pakistan v. Malik Ghulam Mustfa Khar PLD 1989 S.C. 26.
4.
Benazir Bhutto v. Federation of Pakistan PLD 1989 S.C. 66.
5.
Darshan Masih v. The State PLD 1990 S.C. 513.
6.
Shehla Zia v. WAPDA PLD 1994 S.C. 693.
7.
Muhammad Nawaz Sharif v. President of Pakistan PLD 1993 S.C. 473.
8.
Government of Sindh and another v. Sharif Faridi and Others PLD 1994 S.C. 105.
9.
1973 Constitution, article 177 (1) reads: "The chief justice of Pakistan shall be appointed by the President, and each of the other judges shall be appointed by the president after consultation with the chief justice." While Article 193(1) reads: "A judge of a high court shall be appointed by the president after consultation:
(a) with the chief justice of Pakistan;
(b) with the governor concerned; and
(c) except where the appointment is that of chief justice, with the chief justice of the high court.
10.
Relevant parts of Articles 203(C) pertaining to the Federal Shariat Court read:
"(2) The court shall consist of not more than eight Muslim judges, including the

-75-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Pakistan, 1997
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - Pakistan Elections 1997: One Step Forward 1
  • Conclusion 14
  • Notes 15
  • 2 - Is Pakistan's Past Relevant for Its Economic Future? 17
  • Notes 33
  • 3 - Pakistan and the Post-Cold War Environment 37
  • Notes 57
  • 4 - Judiciary in Pakistan: A Quest for Independence 61
  • Conclusions 73
  • Notes 75
  • 5 - Liberalization of the Economy Through Privatization 79
  • Conclusions 89
  • Notes 97
  • 6 - Revivalism, Islamization, Sectarianism, and Violence in Pakistan 101
  • Notes 118
  • 7 - Challenging the State: 1990s Religious Movements in the Northwest Frontier Province 123
  • Notes 138
  • 8 - Pakistan's Environment: Pressures, Status, Impact, and Responses 143
  • Notes 159
  • Chronology (september 1994-April 1997) 163
  • About the Contributors 181
  • Index 183
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 192

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.