Historical Sketches of Statesmen Who Flourished in the Time of George III - Vol. 1

By Lord Henry Brougham | Go to book overview

SIR SAMUEL ROMILLY.

How different from Mr. Pitt's conduct was that of Lord Grenville, who no sooner acceded to office in 1806, than he encouraged all the measures which first restrained, and then entirely abolished that infernal traffic! The crown lawyers of his administration were directed to bring in a bill for abolishing the foreign slave-trade of our colonies, as well as all importation into the conquered settlements -- and when it is recollected that Sir Samuel Romilly at that time added lustre and gave elevation to the office of solicitor- general, it may well be supposed that those duties were cheerfully and duly followed both by him and by his honest, learned, and experienced colleague, Sir Arthur Pigott. It is fit that no occasion on which Sir Samuel Romilly is named should ever be passed over without an attempt to record the virtues and endowments of so great and so good a man, for the instruction of after ages.

Few persons have ever attained celebrity of name and exalted station, in any country, or in any age, with such unsullied purity of character, as this equally eminent and excellent person. His virtue was stern and inflexible, adjusted, indeed, rather to the rigorous standard of ancient morality than to the less ambitious and less elevated maxims of the modern code. But in this he very widely differed from the antique model

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Historical Sketches of Statesmen Who Flourished in the Time of George III - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • States Men of the Times of George Iii. 1
  • George Iii. 5
  • Lord Chatham. 17
  • Lord North. 48
  • Lord Loughborough. 70
  • Lord Thurlow. 88
  • Lord Chief Justice Gibbs. 124
  • Mr. Burke. 142
  • Mr. Fox. 178
  • Mr. Sheridan. 210
  • Mr. Windham. 219
  • Mr. Dundas. 227
  • Mr. Erskine. 236
  • Mr. Perceval. 246
  • Lord Grenville. 254
  • Mr. Grattan. 260
  • Sir Samuel Romilly. 290
  • Franklin 314
  • Fredkric Ii. 320
  • Gustavus Iii. 346
  • The Emperor Joseph. 359
  • Appendix. 387
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