Historical Sketches of Statesmen Who Flourished in the Time of George III - Vol. 2

By Lord Henry Brougham | Go to book overview

DR. LAURENCE.

CONTEMPORARY with Sir William Scott, the leading practitioner in his courts, united to him in habits of private friendship, though indeed differing from him in many of his opinions and almost all his habits of thinking, was Dr. Laurence, one of the most able, most learned, and most upright men that ever adorned their common profession, or bore a part in the political controversies of their country. He was, indeed, one of the most singularly endowed men, in some respects, that ever appeared in public life. He united in himself the indefatigable labour of a Dutch Commentator, with the alternate playfulness and sharpness of a Parisian Wit. His general information was boundless; his powers of mastering any given subject, were not to be resisted by any degree of dryness or complication in its details; and his fancy was lively enough to shed light upon the darkest, and to strew flowers round the most barren tracks of inquiry, had it been suffered to play easily and vent itself freely. But, unfortunately, he had only the conception of the Wit, with the execution of the Commentator; it was not Scarron or Voltaire speaking in society, or Mrabeau in public, from the stores of Erasmus or of Bayle; but it was Hemsterhuysius emerging into polished life, with the dust of many libraries upon him, to make the circle gay; it was Grævius entering the Senate with somewhere from one-half to

-81-

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Historical Sketches of Statesmen Who Flourished in the Time of George III - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction. v
  • Contents xiii
  • Contents of the Furst Series. *
  • Statesmen of the Times of George Iii. 1
  • Lord Eldon. 54
  • Sir William Scott (lord Stowell). 73
  • Dr. Laurence. 81
  • Sir Philip Francis. 88
  • Mr. Horne Tooke. 104
  • Lord Castlereagh. 121
  • Lord Liverpool. 131
  • Mr. Tierney. 143
  • Lord St. Vincent -- Lord Nelson. 156
  • Mr. Horner -- Lord King -- Mr. Ricardo. 172
  • Charles Carrol *
  • Neckar. 199
  • Madame De Staël. 214
  • Mirabeau Family. *
  • Carnôt. *
  • Lafayette. 286
  • Prince Talleyrand. *
  • Napoleon -- Washington. 318
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