The Truth about the Peace Treaties - Vol. 1

By David Lloyd George | Go to book overview

CONTENTS
PREFACEp.5
CHAPTER I
INTRODUCTORYp.17
Vast scope of Peace Settlement -- Criticism often based on prejudice or ignorance -- Illusions regarding inspiration and authorship -- Why war aims were kept moderate -- Influence of Neutral and American opinion -- Main features fixed before Versailles -- Mr. Asquith's statement of terms -- summary of initial war aims -- Modifications: Colonial and Turkish wars-Italy's war bargaining -- The devastated areas -- The 1916 Review of the Peace Problem -- The Foreign Office Memorandum on Territorial Settlement -- Restoration of Belgium -- Alsace -- Lorraine -- Poland -- The Balkans -- Future of Montenegro -- Greater jugo -- Slavia -- jugo -- Slav Statistics -- Future of Austro-Hungary: the future of German Austria - Bohemia to be tacked on to Poland -- Summary of suggestions -- Permanent, not vindictive settlement the objective -- German policy -- Disarmament possible if Germany defeated -- League of Nations -- Danger in event of stalemate -- Outlook in December, 1916 -- My decision to consult Dominions -- Allied reply to German and American Peace Notes -- Military position in winter of 1916-17 -- Failing confidence on the Home Front -- The Allies' Peace proposals in December, 1916 -- America's tacit acceptance -- Comparison with ultimate Peace Settlement -- Imperial Cabinet discussion: my statement of Peace aims -- Soundness of original ideals -- Turkey -- German Colonies -- League of Nations approved - Imperial Unity on Peace aims -- Popular uneasiness in winter of 1917 -- Russian influence -- Allied weakness -- My statement of Peace aims in January, 1918 -- President Wilson's Fourteen Points -- Their agreement with Allies' Peace aims -- The Colonial issue -- Freedom of the Seas - Minute of Allied discussion -- The right of blockade -- Need to include Reparations -- America not limited by the Fourteen Points -- Agreement on Reparations -- Wilson obdurate about Freedom of the Seas -- Col. House sees reason -- Armistice stipulations of the Allies -- Clemenceau's evidence on Wilson's acceptance of Allied View -- General acceptance by Allies of the Fourteen Points -- Allied war sacrifices -- Fantastic myths about the Big Four -- All main features of Peace agreed before the Armistice -- Sensational charges unwarranted -- Unforeseen débêcle of Austria-Hungary.
CHAPTER II
PREPARATIONS FOR THE TREATY: INTERALLIED
CONFERENCESp.92
Treaty attacked as too lenient -- Punishment of war crimes only post-war addition to terms -- Decisive part played by Imperial War Cabinet.

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