Nitobe Inazô: Japan's Bridge across the Pacific

By John F. Howes | Go to book overview

elated to know that Oriental exclusion was terminated by the U.S. Congress in 1952. Most rewarding would be the awareness that Western peoples today look to Japan for models of human organization and spirit for the sake of a better life. The ascendancy of liberal internationalism rests upon groundwork which Nitobe helped to erect. But on his return, the bridge builder would not bask in the pride of accomplishment. Rather, Nitobe Inazô would attend to the still unfinished task of spreading the Geneva spirit.


Notes
1
Nitobe Inazô, "Opening Address at the Kyoto Conference of the Institute of Pacific Relations", October 28, 1929; in Works 4:359; also published as "Japan's Preparedness for International Co-operation", in Pacific Affairs 2, no. 1, ( January 1930).
2
Quoted in Tokyo Nichi Nichi ( English edition), April 12, 1933, p. 7.
3
Miwa Kimitada, "Crossroads of Patriotism in Imperial Japan: Shiga Shigeta (1863-1927), Uchimura Kanzô (1861-1930), and Nitobe Inazô (1862-1933)", Ph.D. diss., Princeton University, 1967, p. 361.
4
William Robert Carter, "With the Nitobes in America, 1911-12", (chapter of unpublished thesis draft), p. 45.
5
Ibid., p. 83. Quotation from Tsurumi's English diary.
6
Tsurumi to Wilson, November 15, 1918, Wilson to Tsurumi, November 18, 1918: Woodrow Wilson Presidential Papers, Library of Congress, Reel 249.
7
Charles F. Howlett, Troubled Philosopher: John Dewey and the Struggle for World Peace ( Port Washington, N.Y: Kennikat Press, 1977), pp. 31, 45; George Dykhuizen, The Life and Mind of John Dewey (Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1973), pp. 182-85.
8
John Higham, History ( Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1965), p. 174; Richard T. Ely, "Economic Internationalism", in The Chautauquan 10 ( February 1890):538-42; Miwa, "Crossroads", pp. 86-87.
9
Miwa, "Crossroads", p. 345, quoting from Yanaihara Tadao, ed., Nitobe hakushi shokumin seisaku kôgi oyobi ronbun shû ( Tokyo: Iwanami shoten, 1943), p. 66.
10
Miwa, "Crossroads", p. 278.
11
Carter, "With the Nitobes", pp. 47, 53; George W. Egerton, Great Britain and the Creation of the League of Nations ( Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1978), p. 8; Shidehara heiwa zaidan, ed., Shidehara Kijûrô ( Tokyo: Shidehara heiwa zaidan, 1955), pp. 136, 137. On Marburg, see Thomas W. Burkman, "The Campaign of Theodore Marburg to Recruit Japan for the League of Nations", in Virginia Consortium for Asian Studies, Occasional Papers, 3 ( Spring 1986) pp. 51-60.
12
See p. 168 in this volume.
13
Yanaihara. Tadao, ed., Nitobe hakushi bunshû ( Tokyo: Ko Nitobe hakushi kinen jigyô jikkô iin, 1936), pp. 408-9.
14
Baltimore Sun, 12 January 1912, p. 8; Miwa, "Crossroads", pp. 276, 345; Nitobe, "Japan, the League of Nations, and the Peace Pact", radio broadcast, May 8, 1932, Works 4:247.
15
Nitobe interview in Baltimore Evening Sun, January 13, 1912, p. 2.

-209-

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Nitobe Inazô: Japan's Bridge across the Pacific
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • About the Contributors xv
  • Editorial Conventions xvii
  • One - Introduction 1
  • 1 - Who Was Nitobe? 3
  • Two - Maturation 25
  • 2 - Roots 27
  • 3 - Graduate Student and Quaker 71
  • Three - Cultural Identity 77
  • 4 - Japann Watchers: 1903-1931 79
  • 5 - Bushido: Its Admirers and Critics 117
  • 6 - Philippine Bushido 130
  • 7 - Toward Remaking Manliness 155
  • Four - Japan in the World 157
  • 8 - Colonial Theories and Practices in Prewar Japan 159
  • Notes 174
  • 9 - The Geneva Spirit 209
  • Five - Evaluation 215
  • 10 - Journalism: the Last Bridge 217
  • 12 - The End: 1929-1933 272
  • 13 - Darkened Lanterns in a Distant Garden 301
  • 14 - Conclusion 315
  • About the Book and Editor 317
  • Index 319
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