Nitobe Inazô: Japan's Bridge across the Pacific

By John F. Howes | Go to book overview

of October, surgery was recommended, in spite of the obvious risk. Mary after much deliberation consented. 144

Four doctors operated for an hour on the morning of October 15. Nitobe regained consciousness around 4 P.M., but he quietly passed away at 8:34 P.M. with Mary and several others at his side. 145

An autopsy revealed that he had pancreatitis, pneumonia, and diabetes. 146 A short memorial service was held in Victoria on October 16th. Then the remains were taken to Vancouver to be cremated. Takagi Yasaka, who had just arrived that morning after a long plane journey from New York, accompanied them. 147

Two days later a large funeral service was held in downtown Vancouver at the St. Andrews Wesley Church. After the service, the urn containing Nitobe's ashes was taken to Mary in Victoria. On October 23, she left Victoria with her nurse Mori and her niece, Mary Duguid, for San Francisco. There, after another memorial service on November 4, the three of them returned on November 16, to Japan with the urn. At the harbor in Yokohama on the dark grey morning, "some 1000 [people] . . . came especially to meet the ashes."148

Nitobe was accorded a hero's funeral. He received the posthumous Order of the Sacred Treasure, First-Class. A special messenger brought Imperial condolences to his home to join the nearly two hundred other expressions of sympathy from all over the world. Prime Minister Saitô and other leading officials joined representatives from foreign legations and hundreds of other leaders to pay their respects. After the services, the urn returned to the Kobinata home for a few days, to be buried after the events described earlier by Howes on page 48, beside those of Nitobe's infant son, in Tokyo's Tama Cemetery. 149

Though Nitobe's efforts to gain acceptance of Japan's case abroad were acclaimed by the Japanese public immediately after his death, the rapid developments after 1933 quickly made his work seem irrelevant. Japan's deepening involvement in China led to full-scale conflict after 1937 and then war with the United States in 1941. Nitobe was forgotten.


Notes
1
See chapters nine and ten.
2
The IPR initiated and supported a whole range of academic studies dealing with the Pacific and Asia, so that its publications and other title listings number more than 1200, yet surprisingly little has been published on the organization itself. A good summary account of the IPR is Paul Hooper, Elusive Destiny ( Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1980), pp. 105-36. Another study of the organization with focus on the post-war period is John N. Thomas, The Institute of Pacific Relations: Asian Scholars and American Politics ( Seattle: University of Washington

-272-

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Nitobe Inazô: Japan's Bridge across the Pacific
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • About the Contributors xv
  • Editorial Conventions xvii
  • One - Introduction 1
  • 1 - Who Was Nitobe? 3
  • Two - Maturation 25
  • 2 - Roots 27
  • 3 - Graduate Student and Quaker 71
  • Three - Cultural Identity 77
  • 4 - Japann Watchers: 1903-1931 79
  • 5 - Bushido: Its Admirers and Critics 117
  • 6 - Philippine Bushido 130
  • 7 - Toward Remaking Manliness 155
  • Four - Japan in the World 157
  • 8 - Colonial Theories and Practices in Prewar Japan 159
  • Notes 174
  • 9 - The Geneva Spirit 209
  • Five - Evaluation 215
  • 10 - Journalism: the Last Bridge 217
  • 12 - The End: 1929-1933 272
  • 13 - Darkened Lanterns in a Distant Garden 301
  • 14 - Conclusion 315
  • About the Book and Editor 317
  • Index 319
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