Nitobe Inazô: Japan's Bridge across the Pacific

By John F. Howes | Go to book overview

Greatness in a garden is always marked by landscapes which, on viewing, bring more than beauty, for they possess a second, inner greatness by which we are being, almost unconsciously, touched. In the Nitobe Memorial Garden, Mori's art reminds us of the greatness of both men.


Notes
1
See David Morton with photographs by Alex Waterhouse-Hayward, "Signs of the Rising Sun: When is a Japanese garden more than a Japanese garden? When a man thinks he's discovered its celestial connections", Saturday Night, August 1988, pp. 42-28. The man in the title is me.
2
For a vivid demonstration of the artistic and scientific use in China of the ancient astronomical knowledge adopted in Japan and illustrated in the garden, see Edward H. Schafer, Pacing the Void ( Berkeley: University of California Press, 1977).
3
Conversation between John E. Howes and Ronald P. Dore, July 29, 1994. I thank Howes for providing much of the biographical data on Mori. It comes from Mori Kannosuke no gyôseki to sakuhin ( Tokyo, 1964), a compilation of biographical data and articles by and about Mori published by his students.
4
Conversation with Albert Farley, about January 1964.
5
Mori Kannosuke no gyôseki, pp. 41, 53-55.
6
Ibid., pp. 66-69.
7
Conversation between John F. Howes and Miyagi Shiûsaku, Mori's successor in garden design at Chiba University, May 28, 1994.
8
See p. 15 of this volume.
9
Authur Waley, The Nô Plays of Japan ( New York: Grove, 1957), pp. 21-22.
10
Encyclopedia Nipponica 2001 ( Tokyo: Shogakkan, 1988) 23:197.
11
Using data from the Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris for the Year 1933 for the Meridian of the Royal Observatory at Greenwich (Standard Edition) ( London: His Majesty's Stationery Office, 1931), pp. 18 and 444, one can calculate that at noon on October 15, 1933, to an observer in Victoria, where Nitobe lay on his death bed, the center of the sun was only 2.1 degrees above Spica and 0.07 degrees to the right of it. If Mori did not have his own copy of an ephemeris, one was easily available in the university library.
12
I learned of the tree's age through conversation with Vladimir Krajina, the foremost expert on old trees of coastal British Columbia, August 28, 1987; Mori could have learned it from Dr. Neill.
13
Hirai's translation of the kasô points appears in Bruno Taut, Houses and People of Japan ( Tokyo: The Sanseido Company, 1937).
14
Details on these systems and their pervasive influence on Japanese society from ancient to modern times can be found in Masayoshi Sugimoto and David L.Swain, Science and Culture in Traditional Japan, A.D. 600-1854 ( Cambridge Massachusetts: MIT Press, 1978).
15
According to Richard Seaton of the University of British Columbia's School of Architecture, Mori's preliminary plan of the garden proposed such a large area of water that the plan was rejected by the university's special garden committee. I

-301-

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Nitobe Inazô: Japan's Bridge across the Pacific
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • About the Contributors xv
  • Editorial Conventions xvii
  • One - Introduction 1
  • 1 - Who Was Nitobe? 3
  • Two - Maturation 25
  • 2 - Roots 27
  • 3 - Graduate Student and Quaker 71
  • Three - Cultural Identity 77
  • 4 - Japann Watchers: 1903-1931 79
  • 5 - Bushido: Its Admirers and Critics 117
  • 6 - Philippine Bushido 130
  • 7 - Toward Remaking Manliness 155
  • Four - Japan in the World 157
  • 8 - Colonial Theories and Practices in Prewar Japan 159
  • Notes 174
  • 9 - The Geneva Spirit 209
  • Five - Evaluation 215
  • 10 - Journalism: the Last Bridge 217
  • 12 - The End: 1929-1933 272
  • 13 - Darkened Lanterns in a Distant Garden 301
  • 14 - Conclusion 315
  • About the Book and Editor 317
  • Index 319
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