Nitobe Inazô: Japan's Bridge across the Pacific

By John F. Howes | Go to book overview

About the Book and Editor

This collection of essays chronicles for the first time in any language the career and works of pre-World War IIJapan's premier internationalist. A self-proclaimed "bridge across the Pacific," Nitobe used his superb command of English to interpret the Japanese people to the English-speaking world and to explain the West to his fellow Japanese. His success led to his appointment as Under Secretary of the League of Nations, before the Japanese invasion of Manchuria in 1931 led to his tragic downfall. Japan had forsaken his cosmopolitan vision, and not even his Quaker charm and eloquence could stand against the raw evidence of the Japanese army's aggression.

At the time of his death in 1933, Nitobe was the best-known Japanese outside his country, yet he has been ignored for six decades, perhaps because his fellow citizens have been unable to face the sober realities of their complicity in their army's excesses. In this groundbreaking volume, historians from North America and Japan revisit the signal contributions of this remarkable man and provide thoughtful new insights into the origins of Japan's road to Pearl Harbor.

John E Howes is professor of Japan Studies at Obirin University, Tokyo.

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Nitobe Inazô: Japan's Bridge across the Pacific
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • About the Contributors xv
  • Editorial Conventions xvii
  • One - Introduction 1
  • 1 - Who Was Nitobe? 3
  • Two - Maturation 25
  • 2 - Roots 27
  • 3 - Graduate Student and Quaker 71
  • Three - Cultural Identity 77
  • 4 - Japann Watchers: 1903-1931 79
  • 5 - Bushido: Its Admirers and Critics 117
  • 6 - Philippine Bushido 130
  • 7 - Toward Remaking Manliness 155
  • Four - Japan in the World 157
  • 8 - Colonial Theories and Practices in Prewar Japan 159
  • Notes 174
  • 9 - The Geneva Spirit 209
  • Five - Evaluation 215
  • 10 - Journalism: the Last Bridge 217
  • 12 - The End: 1929-1933 272
  • 13 - Darkened Lanterns in a Distant Garden 301
  • 14 - Conclusion 315
  • About the Book and Editor 317
  • Index 319
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