Fourteenth Century Verse & Prose

By Kenneth Sisam | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE.

Þere ben manye oþer dyuerse contrees and manye oþer
merueyles beʒonde, pat I haue not seen: wherfore of hem
I can not speke propurly, to tell ʒou the manere of hem.
And also in the contrees where I haue ben, ben manye265 mo dyuersitees of many wondirfull thinges þanne I make
mencioun of, for it were to longe thing to deuyse ʒou the
manere. And þerfore þat þat I haue deuysed ʒou of certeyn
contrees, þat I haue spoken of before, I beseche ʒoure worthi
and excellent noblesse þat it suffise to ʒou at this tyme. For270 ʒif þat I deuysed ʒou all þat is beʒonde the see, another man
peraunter, þat wolde peynen him and trauaylle his body for
to go into þo marches for to encerche þo contrees, myghte
ben blamed be my wordes, in rehercynge manye straunge
thinges; for he myghte not seye no thing of newe, in the275 whiche the hereres myghten hauen ouþer solace or desport or
lust or lykyng in the herynge. For men seyn allweys þat
newe thinges and newt tydynges ben plesant to here.
Wherfore I wole holde me stille, withouten ony more rehercyng
of dyuersiteeʒ or of meruaylles þat ben beʒonde, to þat entent280 and ende þat whoso wil gon into þo contrees, he schall
fynde ynowe to speke of, þat I haue not touched of in no
wyse.

And ʒee schull vndirstonde, ʒif it lyke ʒou, þat at myn
hom comynge I cam to Rome, and schewed my lif to oure285 holy fadir the Pope, and was assoylled of all þat lay in my
conscience, of many a dyuerse greuous poynt, as men mosten
nedes þat ben in company, dwellyng amonges so many
a dyuerse folk of dyuerse secte and of beleeve, as I haue ben
290 And amonges all, I schewed hym this tretys, þat I had made after informacioun of men þat knewen of thinges þat I had
not seen myself; and also of merueyles and customes þat
I hadde seen myself, as fer as God wolde ʒeue me grace:

-104-

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Fourteenth Century Verse & Prose
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction ix
  • The Texts xlv
  • Select Bibliography xlvi
  • I - Robert Mannyng of Brunne's Handlyng Synne Begun 1303 1
  • II - Sir Orfeo 13
  • III - Michael of Northgate's Ayenbyte of Inwyt 32
  • IV - Richard Rolle of Hampole 36
  • V - Sir Gawayne and the Grene Knight About 1350-75. 43
  • VI - The Pearl 57
  • VII - The Gest Hystoriale of the Destruction of Troy 68
  • VIII - Piers Plowman (1362-1400) 76
  • IX - Mandeville's Travels 94
  • Epilogue. 104
  • X - The Bruce Written in 1375 by John Barbour. 107
  • XI - John Wiclif 115
  • XII - John Gower D. 1408. 129
  • XIII - John of Trevisa's Translation of Higden's Polychronicon 1387. 145
  • XIV - Political Pieces 151
  • XV - Miscellaneous Pieces in Verse 162
  • XVI - The York Play 'Harrowing of Hell' 171
  • Xvii the Towneley Play of Noah 185
  • Notes 204
  • Appendix the English Language in the Fourteenth Century 265
  • A Middle English Vocabulary 293
  • Glossary 297
  • Index of Names. 455
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