Fourteenth Century Verse & Prose

By Kenneth Sisam | Go to book overview

GLOSSARY
A,pron. he, XIIIa 27, 47, 48; they, XIII a 13, b 22, 36, 39, 61, 64, 66. [Unaccented form of ME. ha. See Hare, Ham.]
A , v. inf. have, I 127. [Reduced unaccented form of haue; see Habbe(n).]
A (n), adj. one, IV b 34; indef. art. a(n), I 22, VIII b 7, &c. See Ane, On(e).
A (n), prep. on, in, &c. II 137, III introd., 22, VIII a 43, XIII a 11, b 19, 34, &c.; a blode, with blood, XV g 16; a nyghtes, at night (OE. on hilt, nihtes), VIII b 16; a þre, in three, XIII b 49 (sea Ato, Atwynne); a Goddes half, for God's sake, XII b 80. [Weakened form of On, q.v.; an in III is possibly dialectal; a is used only before following consonant.] SeaAne.
Abandoune , v. to abandon, resign, X 50. [OFr. abandouner.]
Abasshed , pp. perturbed, XVI 177 (note to XVI 59). [AFr. abaiss-; OFr. e(s)bair, o(s)baiss-.]
Abate , v. to lessen, XIV b 19; reduce, VIII a 209 (imper. sg.); intr. XVII 445; Abati (of), pp. ceased, VII 104, [OFr. abatre.]
Abedde , adv. in bed, XII a 141. [OE. on bedde.] SeeBedd(e).
Abhomynable , adj. abominable, XI b 90. [OFr. abominable.]
Abide, Abyde, Habide , v. (i) intr. to wait, remain, stay, 1184, IX 197, XVII 531; tarry, II 348; imper. wait!, V 149; halt!, XVI 213; (ii) trans. to await, XVII 334; withstand, endure, XIV b 31; Abode, pa. t. XIV c 68, XVII 373; Abyde, pp. in ys abyde, has survived, XIII b 50. [OE. ā-bīdan.] SeeBide.
Abite , n. outward appearance, XI b 99. [OFr. (h)abit.]
Able , adj. able, VI 239, XI b 92. [OFr. (h)able.] SeeVnable.
Abone , adv. above, XVII 146. SeeAboue(n).
Abosted , pa. t. sg. threatened boastfully, VIII a 148. [ME. a- + Boste, q. v.]
Aboue(n), Abovin, Abuf , adv. above, overhead, on top, v 149, VII 105, 135, IX 56, X 61; on the surface, VII 160; prep. above, higher than, XI b 182, XVII 83; quasi-sb. in be at hera aboue, get the upper hand of them, XIII a 61. [OE. *ox-bufan, abufan.] SeeAbone.
Abousseyd , adj. aforesaid, IX 307. [Pree. + pp. of Seie.]
Aboute (n), Abowte, Obout (XIV a), (i) adv. about, round, on all sides, here and there, to and fro, I 233, v 165, VIII a 297, XI b 270, XII a 143, b 117, XIV a 15, xv i 3, XVII 303, 351, &c.; round about, VII 83, &c.; round it, II 359; al aboute round, all round about, XII a 79; (ii) prep. about, round, &c. (often following n. or pron.), I 54, II 274, 284, V 95, XIV b 68, &c. on, XI b 236; in, XI b 293, 296; about al, in all directions, II 387; aboute with for to (vn-bynde), XVI 7. [OE. onbūtan, ābūtan.]
Abrod, adv. out wide, XII a 176. [OE. on + brād.]
Abuf . SeeAboue.
Abugge , v. to pay for (it), VIII a 75, 159. [OE. ā-bycgan.) See Bigge.
Ac , conj. but, II56, III 34, VIII 67, &c. [OE. ac.]
Acheue , v. achieve, VI 115. [OFr. achever.] SeeCheue.

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Fourteenth Century Verse & Prose
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction ix
  • The Texts xlv
  • Select Bibliography xlvi
  • I - Robert Mannyng of Brunne's Handlyng Synne Begun 1303 1
  • II - Sir Orfeo 13
  • III - Michael of Northgate's Ayenbyte of Inwyt 32
  • IV - Richard Rolle of Hampole 36
  • V - Sir Gawayne and the Grene Knight About 1350-75. 43
  • VI - The Pearl 57
  • VII - The Gest Hystoriale of the Destruction of Troy 68
  • VIII - Piers Plowman (1362-1400) 76
  • IX - Mandeville's Travels 94
  • Epilogue. 104
  • X - The Bruce Written in 1375 by John Barbour. 107
  • XI - John Wiclif 115
  • XII - John Gower D. 1408. 129
  • XIII - John of Trevisa's Translation of Higden's Polychronicon 1387. 145
  • XIV - Political Pieces 151
  • XV - Miscellaneous Pieces in Verse 162
  • XVI - The York Play 'Harrowing of Hell' 171
  • Xvii the Towneley Play of Noah 185
  • Notes 204
  • Appendix the English Language in the Fourteenth Century 265
  • A Middle English Vocabulary 293
  • Glossary 297
  • Index of Names. 455
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