The Flowers of Evil

By Charles Baudelaire; James McGowan | Go to book overview

EXPLANATORY NOTES
The arrangement of the poems is that of the 1861 second edition of the Flowers, supplemented by 16 poems from The Waifs (1866), and also by the poems added to the 1868 third edition of the Flowers. I follow the arrangement in the Gallimard edition of Les Fleurs du Mal ( 1972), except that I have returned the six pieces condemned by the court in 1857 from their place in The Waifs to their original placement in the first edition. Thus, "'The Jewels'", coming after poem no. 21, "'Hymn to Beauty'", has been numbered 21a, to show that it has been inserted, and I have numbered the other inserted pieces similarly. The numbering of the 1861 edition has therefore been preserved, but the reader can also readily see the original context in which Baudelaire had located the poems.I have found the following sources particularly useful in compiling these notes:
ADAM, ANTOINE, ed., Baudelaire: 'Les Fleurs du Mal' ( Paris: Garnier Frères, 1961).
CHÉRIX, ROBERT-BENOIT, ed., Commentaire des 'Fleurs du Mal', Collection d'Études et de Documents Littéraires ( Genève: Pierre Cailler, 1949).
DELABROY, JEAN, ed., Charles Baudelaire: 'Les Fleurs du Mal', Collection Textes et Contextes (La Creuse, France: Louis Magnard, 1989).
DUPONT, JACQUES, ed., Charles Baudelaire: 'Les Fleurs du Mal' ( Paris: Flammarion, 1991).
PICHOIS, CLAUDE, Baudelaire, trans. Graham Robb ( London: Hamish Hamilton, 1989).
----- ed., Charles Baudelaire: 'Les Fleurs du Mal', Édition de 1861, Collection Poésie ( Paris: Gallimard, 1972).

I also thank Jonathan Culler for his suggestions and additions. References to Culler in the notes below pertain to our correspondence during the preparation of this book, unless otherwise noted.

The references to Baudelaire's prose poems apply specifically to Rosemary Lloyd, trans., Charles Baudelaire: The Prose Poems and 'La Fanfarlo', The World's Classics ( New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991).

Théophile Gautier. ( 1811-72) one of the foremost French poets3 of the generation previous to Baudelaire's. Baudelaire admired

-350-

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The Flowers of Evil
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction xiii
  • Note on the Text xxxviii
  • Select Bibliography xlix
  • A Chronology of Charles Baudelaire li
  • Translator''s Preface liv
  • Spleen et Idéal 8
  • Tableaux Parisiens 164
  • Le Vin 212
  • Fleurs Du Mal 226
  • Révolte 262
  • La Mort 274
  • Les Épaves 294
  • Additions de la Troisième édition Des Fleurs Du Mal (1868) 328
  • Explanatory Notes 350
  • Index of Titles 386
  • Index of First Lines 391
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