Aristotle's Poetics

By Aristotle; John Baxter et al. | Go to book overview

George Whalley on the Poetics:
A Preface

PROLOGUE

George Whalley worked on Aristotle Poetics, in one way or another, for a period of nearly two decades, but the main portion of his project was completed in the late sixties and early seventies. The central work of translation and commentary was substantially complete by 1970. In June of 1969 he delivered a talk at the meetings of the Learned Societies, "On Translating Aristotle's Poetics", which was then published in the University of Toronto Quarterly ( 1970). This was followed by the essay on "The Aristotle-Coleridge Axis" ( University of Toronto Quarterly, 1973).

Why the translation-and-commentary was not published quickly is not finally clear. Robin Strachan, then Director of McGill-Queen's University Press, was very much interested in publishing it, and Whalley himself, in his correspondence from the period, thinks of its appearance in print as imminent. In a general way, it is fairly easy to guess at some of the major reasons for delay. Whalley's standing as a distinguished scholar and a defender of humane studies in the universities, in Canada, and in the rest of the world made for large demands on his time. He continued to work on what was proving to be the monumental task of editing Coleridge's marginalia, and he maintained his interest in the legendary and historical matter of John Hornby by editing the diary of Edgar Christian, published as Death in the Barren Ground ( 1980). In addition, he was not in the best of health in the years leading up to his own death in 1983.

His numerous scholarly and academic interests, however, should not be thought of as merely deflecting him from the task of Aristotle. The freshness of his approach to the Poetics is intimately related to the breadth of vision that it embodies, and that in turn, of course, is tied

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Aristotle's Poetics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Aristotle's Poetics i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • George Whalley on the Poetics: A Preface ix
  • Notes xxxiii
  • On Translating Aristotle's Poetics 3
  • Notes 29
  • The Poietic Art 33
  • Works Cited in the Commentary 37
  • Topical Summary 39
  • The Poietic Art 43
  • Commentary 44
  • The Poietic Art 45
  • Appendices 145
  • The Aristotle-Coleridge Axis 159
  • Index 179
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 186

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.