The Bible in Spain, Or, the Journeys, Adventures, and Imprisonments of an Englishman: In an Attempt to Circulate the Scriptures in the Peninsula

By George Borrow | Go to book overview

I took the leather and proceeded very deliberately to count out the sum to which the horse-hire amounted, and having delivered it to him in the presence of witnesses, I said, "During the whole journey you have been of no service to us whatever; nevertheless, you have fared like ourselves, and have had all you could desire to eat and drink. I intended, on your leaving us, to present you, moreover, with a propina of two dollars; but since, notwithstanding our kind treatment, you endeavoured to pillage us, I will not give you a cuarto: go, therefore, about your business."

All the audience expressed their satisfaction at this sentence, and told him that he had been rightly served, and that he was a disgrace to Galicia. Two or three women crossed themselves, and asked him if he was not afraid that the Denho, whom he had invoked, would take him away. At last, a respectable-looking man said to him, "Are you not ashamed to have attempted to rob two innocent strangers?"

"Strangers!" roared the fellow, who was by this time foaming with rage; "innocent strangers, carracho! they know more of Spain and Galicia too than the whole of us. Oh, Denho, that servant is no man but a wizard, a nuveiro. Where is Perico?"

He mounted Perico, and proceeded forthwith to another posada. The tale, however, of his dishonesty had gone before him, and no person would house him; whereupon he returned on his steps, and seeing me looking out of the window of the house, he gave a savage shout, and shaking his fist at me, galloped out of the town, the people pursuing him with hootings and revilings.


CHAPTER XXXII.

Martin of Rivadeo--The Factious Mare--Asturians--Luarca--The Seven Bellotas--Hermits--The Asturian's Tale--Strange Guests--The Big Servant--Batuschca.

"WHAT may your business be?" said I to a short, thick, merry-faced fellow in a velveteen jerkin and canvas pantaloons, who made his way into my apartment, in the dusk of the evening.

"I am Martin of Rivadeo, your worship," replied the man, "an alquilador by profession; I am told that you want a horse for your journey into the Asturias to-morrow, and of course a guide: now, if that be the case, I counsel you to hire myself and mare."

"I am become tired of guides," I replied; "so much so that I was thinking of purchasing a pony, and proceeding without any guide at all. The last which we had was an infamous character."

"So I have been told, your worship, and it was well for the bribon that I was not in Rivadeo when the affair to which you allude occurred. But he was gone with the pony Perico before I came back, or I would have bled the fellow to a certainty with my knife. He is a disgrace to the profession, which is one of the most honourable and ancient

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The Bible in Spain, Or, the Journeys, Adventures, and Imprisonments of an Englishman: In an Attempt to Circulate the Scriptures in the Peninsula
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Minerva Library. ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction. v
  • Preface. xi
  • Contents xvii
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 9
  • Chapter III 16
  • Chapter IV 24
  • Chapter V 30
  • Chapter VI 36
  • Chapter VII 41
  • Chapter VIII 47
  • Chapter IX 53
  • Chapter X 62
  • Chapter XI 74
  • Chapter XII 82
  • Chapter XIII 90
  • Chapter XIV 98
  • Chapter XV 105
  • Chapter XVI 113
  • Chapter XVII 120
  • Chapter XVIII 126
  • Chapter XX 135
  • Chapter XXI *
  • Chapter XXII 152
  • Chapter XXIII 160
  • Chapter XXIV 163
  • Chapter XXV 171
  • Chapter XXVI 178
  • Chapter XXVII 187
  • Chapter XXVIII 194
  • Chapter XXIX 203
  • Chapter XXX 212
  • Chapter XXXI 223
  • Chapter XXXII 231
  • Chapter XXXIII 238
  • Chapter XXXIV 244
  • Chapter XXXV 251
  • Chapter XXXVI 252
  • Chapter XXXVII 258
  • Chapter XXXVIII 263
  • Chapter XXXIX 266
  • Chapter XL 273
  • Chapter XLI 282
  • Chapter XLII 288
  • Chapter XLIII 296
  • Chapter XLIV 304
  • Chapter XLV 310
  • Chapter XLVI 313
  • Chapter XLVIII 326
  • Chapter XLIX 332
  • Chapter L 338
  • Chapter LI 346
  • Chapter LII 356
  • Chapter LIII 366
  • Chapter LIV 370
  • Chapter LV 376
  • Chapter LVI 382
  • Chapter LVII 389
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