Scraps of the Untainted Sky: Science Fiction, Utopia, Dystopia

By Tom Moylan | Go to book overview

9
Marge Piercy's Tale of Hope

Historically, all forms of hierarchy have always been based ultimately on gender hierarchy and on the building block of the family unit, which makes it clear that this is the true juncture between a feminist problematic and a Marxist one--not an antagonistic juncture, but the moment at which the feminist project and the Marxist and socialist project meet and face the same dilemma: how to imagine Utopia.

-- FREDRIC JAMESON, "COGNITIVE MAPPING" (355)


I.

With He, She and It, published in the United States in 1991 and in Britain as Body of Glass in 1992, Marge Piercy joins Robinson and anticipates Butler in her critical dystopian negation of the social realities of the 1980s and early 1990s, but in doing so she supersedes Robinson's focus on a structure of feeling and Butler's alternative cultural formation. 1 Continuing her lifelong vocation as a politically engaged writer, she imaginatively traces an oppositional movement that is confrontational, militant, collective, and at least momentarily successful. Like Butler's, Piercy's dystopian elsewhere opens on a hegemonic corporate order wherein twenty-three megafirms compete with one another for profits and power in a world that is ecologically devastated. As the cockroaches of history, the corporate giants have survived war, nuclear bombs, global warming, toxic poisoning, famine, and economic collapse, and they continue to attempt mergers and takeovers that will lead to even larger entities that inherently seek to destroy or absorb their remaining competitors.

Unlike Butler with her socioreligious movement and Robinson with his rebellious individuals, Piercy crucially locates the leading edge of the anti-corporate opposition directly within the contradictory nature of the capitalist machinery of this future society. Both the workers of the urban sprawl called the Glop and the cybernetic designers of the free town of Tikva exist in the tenuous gap between

-247-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Scraps of the Untainted Sky: Science Fiction, Utopia, Dystopia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Permissions ix
  • Preface xi
  • Part One - Science Fiction and Utopia 1
  • 1 - Dangerous Visions 3
  • 2 - Absent Paradigms 29
  • 3 - Daring to Dream 67
  • Part Two - Dystopia 109
  • 4 - New Maps of Hell 111
  • 5 - The Dystopian Turn 147
  • 6 - The Critical Dystopia 183
  • Part Three - Dystopian Maneuvers 201
  • 7 - Kim Stanley Robinson's Other California 203
  • 8 - Octavia Butler's Parables 223
  • 9 - Marge Piercy's Tale of Hope 247
  • 10 - Horizons 273
  • Notes 285
  • Bibliography 333
  • Literary Bibliography and Filmography 367
  • Film and Video 373
  • Index 375
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 386

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.