Psychology and the Soul

By Otto Rank; William D. Turner | Go to book overview

UNDERSTANDING ONESELF AND OTHERS
Religions die when one points out their truth. Science is the history of dead religions.
OSCAR WILDE

ALTHOUGH IT IS CUSTOMARY TO say that scientific psychology originated with Aristotle who first interpreted dreams psychologically, a thorough history of psychology should cover all aspects of man's mental life from its beginning. Prescientific and nonscientific psychology has always been the true psychological discipline and the source of all psychologies, including those that study the soul scientifically. Scientific psychology which seems to know very little about the soul claims to seek the truth about it, but rejects the contributions of ancient beliefs, religion, and myths to its interpretation. It performs experiments which seem always to prove that the soul does not exist, and it lets the more tolerant science of ethnology perform what constructive research it can. Psychoanalysis claims this neglected area of psychology as its own, but it brings in its materialistic psychology to "explain" the soul, instead of first trying to relate its mental concepts to the spiritual sources which generated them. Our present task, therefore, is not to apply psychoanalysis or any other modern psychology to this problem, but to investigate the principles which govern the soul

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Psychology and the Soul
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Translator's Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Understanding Oneself and Others 1
  • Religion and Belief In the Soul 13
  • Psychology And the Sexual Era 33
  • Individualism And Collectivism 71
  • Dream And Reality 94
  • Soul and Will 142
  • Nature and Spirit 168
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