Psychology and the Soul

By Otto Rank; William D. Turner | Go to book overview

INDIVIDUALISM AND COLLECTIVISM
Two spirits dwell at odds within my breast,
And each would gladly from the other part;
The one seems with the single urge obsessed
To keep draws me forth in willful quest
Of visions to a finer world apart.
GOETHE

THE PRECEDING CHAPTER HAS brought us all the way from religious spiritual belief, through a sexual ideology of immortality, to a humanized portrayal of all these concepts in certain character types and psychological interpretations. This last stage, to which our first chapter referred as projective psychology, was a kind of concretion of spiritual phenomena whose significance had formerly been religious and sexual. Such a personification of spiritual phenomena is extremely ancient, and goes back to the religious era of gods and demons which survived in the Middle Ages as ghosts and devils. The human significance of such entities has remained unrecognized only because they have been viewed from the standpoints of introspective psychology and natural science ideology.

If we bear in mind the evolution which belief in an immortal soul underwent from its inception in preanimistic

-71-

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Psychology and the Soul
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Translator's Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Understanding Oneself and Others 1
  • Religion and Belief In the Soul 13
  • Psychology And the Sexual Era 33
  • Individualism And Collectivism 71
  • Dream And Reality 94
  • Soul and Will 142
  • Nature and Spirit 168
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