Psychology and the Soul

By Otto Rank; William D. Turner | Go to book overview

DREAM AND REALITY
We are such stuff
As dreams are made on, and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep
.
SHAKESPEARE

THE PRECEDING CHAPTER SURVEYED the religious, sexual, and psychological stages of spiritual history. The present one concerns the dream, which is not only a spiritual phenomenon par excellence, but also the most subjective and mystical of all mental phenomena, and a phenomenon more inclusive than the dreamer himself, because it allows him both to observe himself and to be at one with the universe.

Man has long been intrigued by such phenomena, but he has not really learned much worth knowing about dreams as such because of his greater concern with what they mean, if anything. Primitive man believed that dreams had a special, divine significance; and whether they were responsible for animism, or vice versa, animistic man regarded them as evidence of his soul and its immortality. These two affirmative beliefs, on the one hand, and modern science's anti- spiritual denial that dreams are meaningful, on the other, serve to show how attitudes toward spiritual belief have variously conditioned the interpretation of dreams from time to time.

-94-

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Psychology and the Soul
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Translator's Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Understanding Oneself and Others 1
  • Religion and Belief In the Soul 13
  • Psychology And the Sexual Era 33
  • Individualism And Collectivism 71
  • Dream And Reality 94
  • Soul and Will 142
  • Nature and Spirit 168
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