English Life in the Middle Ages

By L. F. Salzman | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

No attempt will be made here to give anything approaching a complete list of the books which have been written on the subjects upon which I have touched. I am content to indicate a few books which will be found useful by students, or teachers, who wish to learn more about matters which I have, inevitably, treated in merest outline. Many of these books will be found to contain fuller Bibliographies of their own.

As the Middle Ages are best seen through the eyes of contemporary writers I gave first place to two books by G. G. Coulton--A Medieval Garner, and Social Life in Britain from the Conquest to the Reformation. Both consist of extracts from medieval writers, in the original English or in translation, dealing with every side of life; the Social Life is arranged according to subjects, while the Garner has no kind of arrangement, but affords fine mixed feeding.

Of books dealing generally with my subject, H. W. C. Davis Mediaeval England and Traill Social England both contain good articles and excellent illustrations. Miss Power Medieval People and Quennell History of Every-day Things are both very readable and illuminative. Mention may also be made of Cutt Scenes and Characters of the Middle Ages; Abram, English Life and Manners in the Later Middle Ages; Coulton, Chaucer and his England; Trevelyan, England in the Age of Wyclif ; H. S. Bennett, The Pastons and their England.

For 'Country Life': Harold Peake, The English Village; Seebohm, The English Village Community: Vinogradoff, Villeinage in England (for advanced students); Orr, History of Agriculture; Thorold Rogers, Six Centuries of Work and Wages.

For ' Sport ': Strutt, Sports and Pastimes (ed. Cox); Baillie-Grohman, The Master of Game--a famous fifteenth-century book on hunting, with beautiful illustrations.

For 'Town Life': Riley, Memorials of London--a huge collection of extracts from the City records, containing a mass of varied information; the published Records of other towns, such as Norwich, Leicester, Northampton, and Reading; Miss Dormer Harris, Life in an Old English Town ; Mrs. Green, Town Life in the Fifteenth Century; Gomme, The Making of London; Besant, Medieval London; Furley, Government of Winchester; Hughes and Lamborn, Town Planning.

For ' Home Life': Thomas Wright, Domestic Manners and Sentiments in England; Hubert Hall, Court Life under the Plantagenets ; The Babees Book (Early English Text Soc.)--a fascinating collection of medieval books of etiquette, &c., with excellent notes by Dr. Furnivall.

-283-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
English Life in the Middle Ages
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 7
  • To Nancy 9
  • Preface 11
  • Contents 13
  • List of Illustrations 15
  • I - Introduction 21
  • II - Country Life 36
  • III - Town Life 63
  • IV - Home Life 88
  • V - The Church and Religion 109
  • VI - Education 134
  • VII - Literature 150
  • VIII - Art and Science 171
  • IX - Warfare 186
  • X - Law and Order 215
  • XI - Industry, Trade, and Finance 233
  • XII - Women 249
  • XIII - Wayfaring 266
  • Bibliography 283
  • Index 285
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 290

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.