Nonacademic Writing: Social Theory and Technology

By Ann Hill Duin; Craig J. Hansen | Go to book overview

(p. 189). It is precisely this area that our studies of situated writing have tended to ignore.

The idea that part of knowledge is tacit and socially based is not easy for writing scholars to accommodate, any more than it is for technologists. It reminds us of our own limitations in knowing and controlling the world. As they are commonly thought of, instructions, whether they be addressed to students or technologists, may be a fiction we use to reinforce our belief in the rational, knowable nature of reality. Seeing instructions as rules that enable us to do something is an example of our belief in and desire for the possibility of rational, rule-driven action. In that sense, they are, to paraphrase Geertz ( 1973, p. 448), a story we tell ourselves about ourselves. Instructions are chronological narratives of rational action. The ability to write well, however, is not acquired solely by learning rules, although it would be comforting if it were.


REFERENCES

Arnerine R., & Bilmes J. ( 1990). "Following instructions". In M. Lynch & S. Woolgar (Eds.), Representation in scientific practice (pp. 323-335). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Anson C. M., & Forsberg L. L. ( 1990). "Moving beyond the academic community: Transitional stages in professional writing". Written Communication, 7(2), 200-231.

Brown R. L., & Herndl C. G. ( 1986). "An ethnographic study of corporate writing". In B. Couture (Ed.), Functional approaches to writing: Research perspectives (pp. 11-28). Norwood, NJ: Ablex.

Bruner J. ( 1978). "The role of dialogue in language acquisition". In A. Sinclair, R. J. Jarvella, & W. J. M. Levelt (Eds.), The child's conception of language (pp. 241-255). New York: Springer-Verlag.

Carter M. ( 1990). The idea of expertise: An exploration of cognitive and social dimensions of writing. College Composition and Communication, 41(3), 265-286.

Cazden C. ( 1979). "Peekaboo as an instructional model: Discourse development at home and at school". Papers and Reports of Child Language Development, 17(1), 1-29.

Charney D. ( 1991, March). "Learning to write science: Rules, models, andpractical experience". Paper presented at the Conference on College Composition and Communication, Boston, MA.

Collins H. M. ( 1974). "The TEA set: Tacit knowledge and scientific networks". Science Studies, 4(1), 165-186.

Collins H. M. ( 1985). "Changing order". "Replication and induction in scientific practice". Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.

Collins H. M., Green R. H., & Draper R. C. ( 1985). "Where's the expertise?" Expert systems 85: Proceedings of the fifth technical conference of the British computer society specialist group on expert systems (pp. 323-334). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Dobrin D. ( 1989). "Writing and technique". Urbana, IL: National Council of Teachers of English.

Fahnestock J. ( 1993). "Genre and rhetorical craft". Research in the Teaching of English, 27(3), 265-271.

Forsythe D. E. ( 1993). "Engineering knowledge: The construction of knowledge in artificial intelligence". Social Studies of Science, 23(3), 445-477.

Freedman A. ( 1993a). "Show and tell? The role of explicit teaching in the learning of newgenres"

-170-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Nonacademic Writing: Social Theory and Technology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 376

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.