Nonacademic Writing: Social Theory and Technology

By Ann Hill Duin; Craig J. Hansen | Go to book overview
What kinds of products would appeal to this community? Why? How should their features be described to members of this community?
How much and what kind(s) of power does this community have? How does it communicate its authority or power to other groups?
How does this community use its power to perpetuate or disrupt certain (advertising, product, or corporate culture) messages?

Numerous other questions could be asked, of course, but these examples demonstrate the significant multidisciplinary work that can be done in our research of nonacademic writing. Ultimately, however, we must also recognize the potential advantages and disadvantages of such multidisciplinary approaches. First, by being more adaptive, we can recognize entirely new perspectives on writing that will clarify its power in the workplace, perspectives that had previously escaped our attention. But we must also be more critical of our contexts and understandings, along with our methodologies and perspectives when we assimilate the work from various disciplines. Appropriating another discipline's vocabulary, methodology, or paradigm requires a far more thorough understanding of those elements than simple readings allow. Again, the value of collaboration becomes clear: the ability to expand our knowledge, via collaborative partnerships -- without having to become multidisciplinary experts -- creates tremendous opportunities for better understanding our own discipline and how it works throughout the world's communities.


REFERENCES

Adorno T. W. ( 1950). The authoritarian personality. New York: Harper.

Agger B. ( 1991). "Theorizing the decline of discourse or the decline of theoretical discourse". In P. Wexler (Ed.), Critical theory now (pp. 118-44). New York: Falmer.

Allen J. ( 1991). "Gender issues in technical communication studies: An overview of the implications for the profession, research, and pedagogy". Journal of Business and Technical Writing, 5(4), 371-92.

Arnold E. C. ( 1963). Ink on paper. A handbook of graphic arts. New York: Harper & Row.

Ashley D. ( 1991). "Playing with the pieces: The fragmentation of social theory". In P. Wexler (Ed.), Critical theory now (pp. 70-97). New York: Falmer.

Baker M. A., & Goubil-Gambrell P. ( 1991). "Scholarly writing. The myth of gender and performance". Journal of Business and Technical Writing, 5(4), 412-443.

Baudrillard J. ( 1975). The mirror of production ( M. Poster, Trans.). St. Louis: Telos Press.

Berger P., & Luckman T. ( 1967). The social construction of reality: A treatise in the sociology of knowledge. New York: Doubleday.

Blumer H. ( 1969). Symbolic interactionism: Perspective and method. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Borisoff D., & Merrill L. ( 1987). "Teaching the college course on gender differences as barriersto conflict resolution"

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