Nonacademic Writing: Social Theory and Technology

By Ann Hill Duin; Craig J. Hansen | Go to book overview

hypertextually, individuals traverse shared information along individual paths. Each traversal is a whole, how the universe looks to that individual.

For the analysis of discourse, conceptual framing is a hypertextual approach. A framework offers specific interpretive pathways through a discourse event; here, they are collectivity, performance, historicity, and mediation. Results of traversing the event along any one of these pathways can be compared with results of journeys along other pathways through the same event, or with those same journeys through a different event.

Why is it useful to think of discourse and its analysis as hypertextual? For the individual contemporary interpreter, the metaphor may provoke fresh insight. For the specialty of nonacademic writing, concepts of hypertext bridge our work and work in other fields, including technology development, attempting to understand and to support communication in human organizations. As analysts of rhetorical practices, we have a contributing role to play in multi-disciplinary research communities now intensively exploring ways that social organization and information technology converge in the settings of human work.4


ACKNOWLEDGMENT

For their thoughtful reading of several drafts of this chapter, I am grateful to editors Ann Hill Duin and Craig Hansen; reviewers Marilyn Cooper and Anne Aronson; Syracuse University Writing Program colleagues Duane Roen, James Zebroskie, and especially Kenneth Lindblom. For constructive criticism at all stages of thinking and writing, I am indebted to John Smith. For generous access to sources in Congressional history, I especially thank Richard Baker, the Historian of the United States Senate, and Gregory Harness, Head of Reference, the Senate Library. For sharing their experienced wisdom about present-day Congressional communications, I especially thank Nancy Kingsbury and other staff members of the U.S. General Accounting Office from whom I learn every time I facilitate their training seminars in writing and presenting Congressional testimony.


REFERENCES

Atlas of early American history: The revolutionary era 1760-90. ( 1976). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

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4
They include special interest groups of the Association for Computing Machinery, for example the Hypertext group, Human-Computer Interaction group, and Computer-Supported Cooperative Work group.

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