Nonacademic Writing: Social Theory and Technology

By Ann Hill Duin; Craig J. Hansen | Go to book overview
structure, use, and development of hypertext-supported writing environments?
How might hypertext-supported collaboration challenge (or deepen) existing corporate hierarchies and lines of power?
How is power and hierarchy exercised in hypertext-supported collaboration?
How might hypertext-supported collaborative work help transform social and political landscapes within organizations?
What patterns of communication and behavior emerge in hypertextsupported collaboration? Are these patterns useful for helping writers and managers reconfigure and reform organizational structures?
Will hypertext's potential for surveillance and control suppress and inhibit group members, managers, and organizational stability?
What management strategies might encourage open, productive collaboration in hypertext environments?
Will new patterns of reward and recognition emerge as groups begin to think and work in hypertext?
Who will control or gatekeep hypertext-supported collaborative work within corporations? Writers? Managers? Will writers and managers share this responsibility?

These questions -- necessarily and adamantly open-ended and nonexhaustive -- mark only the starting point for research in hypertext-supported collaborative work. The technology of hypertext clearly does not provide the utopian workspace some early theorists and researchers suggested. But in continually questioning and testing the patterns of collaborative work in hypertext, we can help map the technology and its use in productive and powerful ways.


REFERENCES

Adelson B., & Jordan T. ( 1992). "The need for negotiation in cooperative work". In E. Barrett (Ed.), Sociomedia: Multimedia, hypermedia, and the social construction of knowledge (pp. 469-492). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Allen N. J. ( 1993) "Community, collaboration, and the rhetorical triangle". Technical Communication Quarterly, 1,63-74.

Barrett E. (Ed.). ( 1992). Sociomedia: Multimedia, hypermedia, and the social construction of knowledge. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Barthes R. ( 1977). "The death of the author". In S. Heath (Ed.), Image - music - text (pp. 142-48). New York: Hill & Wang.

Belsey C. ( 1980). Critical practice. London: Methuen.

Berk E., & Devlin J. (Eds.). ( 1991). Hypertext/hypermedia handbook. New York: McGraw- Hill.

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