Stress, Coping, and Cardiovascular Disease

By Philip M. McCabe; Neil Schneiderman et al. | Go to book overview

Preface

Stress, Coping, and Cardiovascular Disease is part of a continuing series of volumes based on the annual University of Miami Symposia on Stress and Coping. These symposia focus on important contemporary research topics related to the basic physiological mechanisms, psychosocial factors, developmental aspects, and mental health factors in the relationship between stress and disease. Previous volumes have included a general discussion of the concept of stress, the psychophysiological processes involved in stress and coping, the interaction of behavior with biological processes, the role of stress in the development of disease and mental disorders during different stages of life, and the role of biopsychosocial factors in four of the most common health problems: cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and the AIDS epidemic.

This volume is focused on the role of biobehavioral and social factors in the leading cause of death in industrialized countries (i.e., cardiovascular disease). Although previous volumes have dealt with these issues in individual chapters, this volume provides an in-depth look at current research dealing with the nervous system and hormonal regulation of cardiovascular function, behavioral-cardiovascular interactions, ethnic differences in cardiovascular regulation, psychosocial influences on cardiovascular systems, and behavioral interventions designed to treat patients following myocardial infarction.

Chapter 1, by Winters, McCabe, Green, and Schneiderman, explores the brain mechanisms involved in emotional responses to stressful stimuli. The authors present an extensive literature review, in addition to describing their own research program, that describes the central nervous system (CNS) circuitry underlying unlearned and learned cardiovascular and be-

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