Stress, Coping, and Cardiovascular Disease

By Philip M. McCabe; Neil Schneiderman et al. | Go to book overview

disorders. The role of stress in cardiovascular disease is seen as a contributing factor that interacts with other variables such as genetic or constitutional factors. Behavioral interventions used in patients who are at risk for cardiovascular disease, or who exhibit cardiovascular disease, are often designed to change lifestyle, reduce stress, or improve adherence to therapeutic regimens. The contents of this volume provide a solid empirical foundation into the relationship of stress and cardiovascular disease, and will hopefully stimulate further research into the pathophysiology and treatment of the leading cause of death in industrialized countries.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Several individuals, groups, and organizations helped make this symposium and volume possible. First, we thank the participants, who gave freely of themselves and helped carry out the symposium on a rather modest budget. Second, we thank our postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, and staff, whose efforts attentuated the stress associated with the symposium and helped us cope with problems as they arose. Third, we thank Ellie Schneiderman for her gracious hospitality during the conference. Fourth, we thank Brian Dursam and his staff for allowing us to use the magnificent surrounds of the Lowe Art Museum for one day of the symposium. Fifth, we thank Rod Wellens, Chair of the Department of Psychology, for financial support and encouragement. We would also like to thank Sandra Racoobian for her help with travel arrangements, symposium logistics, and in preparing this volume. We also gratefully acknowledge financial support from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Training Grant (HL07426), and the National Institute Mental Health Training Grant (MH18917).

-- Philip M. McCabe -- Neil Schneiderman -- Tiffany Field -- A. Rodney Wellens

-xi-

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