Daddy's Gone to War: The Second World War in the Lives of America's Children

By William M. Tuttle Jr. | Go to book overview

PREFACE

Born in 1937, I was a homefront child. My father went into the Army in late 1942 and returned three years later; we had all changed a lot in the interim. I remember many things about wartime: pulling my wagon around the block and collecting bundles of old newspapers, playing war games in the lot next to our house in Detroit, and sitting with my mother in the kitchen listening to the war news on the radio. Both radio and the movies were important parts of my homefront world. Monday through Friday, there were the late-afternoon radio adventure shows in which American heroes pursued enemy spies and saboteurs. And I remember trying never to miss a Saturday matinee at the Norwest, our local movie theater; for three to four hours, the war was a frequent theme in feature films, cartoons, serials, and newsreels.

When we were not playing war in the side lot, we were doing so on the playground of the Peter Vetal School, three blocks from my home. At Vetal, there was a deep division between the middle-class children and the working-class children. In large part, we in the middle class lived on one side of the school, while blue-collar families, including recent arrivals from the southern Appalachians, lived on the other side. I got to know Tommy Fields, whose family had moved to Detroit from Kentucky. We were in the same class, and I visited his house on the other side of the school; I do not think he ever visited mine, but I never thought about it at the time.

Looking back, I see that during the war my little brother George and I lived in a family of women headed by my mother, grandmother, and older sister Susan. Ours was a peaceful household and, from my perspective, a happy one. But I wondered what our lives would be like when my father returned home, and I wondered what he would be like. I did have a V-mail Christmas card that he sent me in 1944 from France, picturing Santa Claus driving a Jeep filled with presents; but I had few memories of him.

In the autumn of 1945, my father re-entered our lives. Forty years old and a major, he arrived sporting both a mustache and the Legion of Merit, which he had earned for his two years as a combat thoracic surgeon in North Africa, Italy, France, and Germany. The more I think about my father's service, particularly in light of what we later learned about the horrors of battle in Vietnam, the more I appreciate the psychic toll which the war took on him.

I was seven when my father came home. Because I had not really known him before he left for the Army, I could not tell how the war had affected him. My father for whom I am named was loud and regaled in storytelling; he liked to laugh, and I enjoyed him when he was having fun. Around him, however, I was usually very shy; I was an outgoing boy and very active, but I think he scared me. We had missed important years together, and we never bridged the gap. My father

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Daddy's Gone to War: The Second World War in the Lives of America's Children
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 368

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.