Daddy's Gone to War: The Second World War in the Lives of America's Children

By William M. Tuttle Jr. | Go to book overview

died in 1962 at the age of fifty-seven. I still believe that, in time, we would have become friends, but we never had a chance to do so. This has been the war's major legacy to me, and it is a sad one.

This book, then, is a personal odyssey as well as a history of a major event in United States history. How I came to write this book, however, is somewhat more complicated. It involves not only the peculiar challenges of writing contemporary history, which I enjoy, but also the recognition that while the writing of history has changed dramatically over the past thirty years, there is still uncharted territory to explore. Some of the theoretical social science concerns that underlie this book are new to the writing of history. So too are some of the topical concerns--not only gender, race, class, and ethnicity, about which we know so much more than we did a few years ago, but also age, or developmental stage, and its function in mediating the effects of history. These topics and issues were not part of my training as an historian in graduate school; yet they are basic to understanding this society.

Like many professional historians trained in the mid- 1960s, I learned a great deal of history but received little encouragement to explore the social sciences for their insights into human behavior. My graduate training at the University of Wisconsin was traditional; I studied the historical canon and did my research in manuscript collections, newspapers, and government documents. There was one difference: because I was specializing in twentieth-century United States history, I could interview people who participated in the events I was researching. But what made Wisconsin memorable was the students, who were bold and committed and never missed an opportunity to debate either politics, or scholarship, or both, because we saw them as interrelated. 1

Having become aware of the discrepancy between America's ideals and its realities in race relations while serving as a training officer in the United States Air Force, I decided that I wanted to study African-American history. (My dear friend in the service, Captain William Woody Farmer, a black B-52 pilot, was killed when his bomber crashed; I think of the good times I had with him, and I think of Captain David Taylor, also African-American, who was my commander and a good friend.) My master's thesis was a history of the Chicago race riot of 1919, and while I read on my own in the sociology of race relations and collective behavior, my teachers seemed to frown upon black history as too narrow a pursuit for a lifelong career of research and writing. I was pleased to resume my studies in African-American history after joining the faculty of the University of Kansas in 1967.

At this time, I also returned to my interest in ordinary voices. Throughout 1968 I talked with black Chicagoans about the 1919 race riot. I interviewed the chief Red Cap at the Illinois Central Station, Chester Wilkins, who told me of the migrant families arriving in the city during the war, and I listened to John Harris, who was fourteen years old and floating on a raft in Lake Michigan with four other black boys on that hot Sunday afternoon in July 1919. John recalled for me

-viii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Daddy's Gone to War: The Second World War in the Lives of America's Children
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 368

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.