To Choose a Future: Resource and Environmental Consequences of Alternative Growth Paths

By Ronald G. Ridker; William D. Watson | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book has grown out of a four-year project involving contributions by a number of persons and funding institutions. Harry Perry provided an early draft of much of what is now the energy chapter. Many of the critical assumptions pertaining to energy-- resources estimates, rates of increase in capacity, costs of alternative energy sources and the like--are based on his recommendations.

William Vogeley developed the mechanism of estimating U.S. demands for nonfuel minerals and provided an early draft of materials in chapter 4. Wesley C. Pickard and Lee Dymond also provided draft materials plus many helpful comments.

Leroy Quance served as principal investigator of a project undertaken by the Economic Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture which provided a report that serves as the basis of chapter 6 on agriculture. He was assisted by a team that included William Crosswhite, Anthony Rojko, and Allen Smith.

Virginia Hendry worked up the basic materials for chapter 8 and provided an early draft. In addition, as a research assistant throughout this projects, she was a member of its core research team. Particularly important was her careful, accurate, indefatigable help with the computer derivation of quantitative estimates and their display for analysis.

As a research associate throughout this project, Adele Shapanka was closely associated with all its phases. In particular, however, she was responsible for most of its technological assumptions and their entry and use in the dynamic input-output model underlying much of this project ("Long-Range Technological Forecast for Use in Studying the Resource and Environment Consequences of U.S. Population and Economic Growth: 1975-2025," RFF Discussion Paper D-31, 1978).

Jack Alterman, in addition to developing the basic labor force and labor productivity projections ("Projections of Labor Force, Labor Productivity, Gross National Product and Households; Methodology and Data," RFF Discussion Paper, 1976), helped us think through many of the more difficult analytical issues linking energy and the environment to the economy.

-xiii-

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To Choose a Future: Resource and Environmental Consequences of Alternative Growth Paths
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Explanatory Noted and Units of Measure xv
  • I - Approaching the Task 1
  • References 13
  • 2 - Assumptions and Scenarios 15
  • References 56
  • 3 - The National Economy 58
  • References 94
  • 4 - Nonfuel Minerals 96
  • Conclusions 148
  • References 154
  • 5 - Energy 157
  • References 216
  • 6 - Agriculture 221
  • References 248
  • 7 - Pollution Costs and Control Benefits 250
  • Conclusions 296
  • 8 - Other Environmental Concerns 325
  • References 368
  • 9 - Summary and Prospects 372
  • References 410
  • Appendix 411
  • References 452
  • Epilogue 456
  • References 459
  • Index 460
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