Beyond the City Limits: Rural History in British Columbia

By R. W. Sandwell | Go to book overview

Contributors
Tony F. Arruda is a doctoral candidate in the Educational Studies Department at the University of British Columbia. His dissertation is on the history of youth in Williams Lake, 1945-75.
Jean Barman is a professor in the Educational Studies Department at the University of British Columbia, and she sits on the board of BC Heritage Trust. She has written and taught widely in the fields of education and Native education and is currently researching mixed-race families in British Columbia.
John Douglas Belshaw, a graduate of UBC, SFU, and the London School of Economics, is now a history professor at the University College of the Cariboo. His research interests include nineteenth-century mining communities and demographic history; he is currently working on a population history of British Columbia.
David Peterson del Mar is an associate professor in the History Program at the University of Northern British Columbia and an occasional counsellor for men who have been arrested for abusing their wives. His book What Trouble I Have Seen: A History of Violence against Wives was published in 1996 by Harvard University Press. He is currently completing a study of the historical relationship between violence and power in British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest.
David Dendy teaches at Okanagan University College. He has researched, written about, and worked in the Okanagan orchard business.
Ken Favrholdt, a historical geographer with an MA from the University of British Columbia, was the curator/archivist for the Kamloops Museum and Archives between 1980 and 1990. His current research focuses on the fur-trade routes though British Columbia and Washington. He is now the museum co-ordinator for the Secwepemc Museum and Native Heritage Park in Kamloops.

-283-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Beyond the City Limits: Rural History in British Columbia
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 296

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.