One Hundred Red Days: A Personal Chronicle of the Bolshevik Revolution

By Edgar Sisson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVIII
January 23--January 28, 1918. The Ringmasters
of the All-Russian Soviet.

1.

IN name the Third All-Russian Soviet, the congress of awed delegates and smart leaders installed in the Tauride Palace on Wednesday, January 23, 1918, was the First All-Russian Soviet in panoply and in power. No parliament house had sheltered its predecessors, nor had many districts of Russia been represented by other than stray and often alien agitators. So this assemblage was planned as fête and lure to the peasants of Russia. Men and women of the soil to whom Petrograd had been only a mystic name were ushered from afar to the capital, and there welcomed and treated as superior beings. Circus and ceremonial was the All-Russian Soviet, as picturesque a gathering as the world might have. Every peasant costume known to Russia was on its floors.

Within the body, and around it, plied a frictionless machinery. Lenin was a party boss. He prepared the spontaneous. Spiridonova was to lead the peasants and the Left Social Revolutionaries into the Bolshevik ranks with fanfare and speech, and the upsurgence was to have the look of irrepressible impulse. Trotsky's oratory was to gloss the defeat at the Peace Conference, Lenin's was to be assertive of confidence and of power.

The Tauride Palace had its own rôle in the creation of impressions. Here the Constituent Assembly had died. Here was proper seat for the display of new-risen dominion. Red flags draped pillars and galleries and rostrum. Seating arrangements had been changed in the auditorium by the removal of desks and replacement with close-set lines of chairs. Room was given for eleven hundred delegates.

The opening session was one of celebration--of band-playing, of the singing of the "International" and the "Marseillaise," and of formal greetings of delegations from near and far places. Trotsky presided.

-256-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
One Hundred Red Days: A Personal Chronicle of the Bolshevik Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 504

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.