One Hundred Red Days: A Personal Chronicle of the Bolshevik Revolution

By Edgar Sisson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXI
February 9 (Retrospect)--February 13, 1928. Tragedy
at Kiev Is Farce at Brest-Litovsk.

THE curtain of silence was vain. The telegraph records penetrated it and delineated the back-scene. With their aid one afterward could sit beyond it at will and through them the public performance visible at the time became lucid. The relation of events can be from both positions-- front and rear.

Kiev was the prize for which the Bolsheviks battled and the Germans intrigued--Kiev and the food-bins of the Ukraine. To win, the Germans were willing to flout the Bolsheviks, thinking the risk slight and not worth a concession. To win, they were willing to make a paper peace with titular representatives of the Rada, a parliament in flight, and to use armies to force the acceptance of the paper upon the Bolsheviks.

Although Kiev, first taken by interior insurrection on January 27 and lost by counterattack on January 30 and 31, was recaptured on February 3 and control consolidated in the days following, the frantic Trotsky did not get reliable news until February 9, the day the Germans signed "Peace" with the Ukrainian delegates. Petrograd was not better informed.

The dispatches of Muraviev served further to confuse Trotsky, who complained bitterly that Muraviev never dated his messages. One such, which from its neighborhood to other dispatches appeared to have been received on February 3, was particularly ominous:

To Stavka, High Command: In the name of the Revolution and the People's Commissar Antonov I demand the immediate dispatch to the Ukraine front, Nikotova, by order of the People's Commissar Antonov, infantry, artillery, and a railroad battalion. Condition serious. Muraviev. [ American Military Intelligence translation.]

The Germans were telling Trotsky the Rada was again in power. He denied and doubted his own words. He did not receive the first circumstantial, formal report of the fall of the

-310-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
One Hundred Red Days: A Personal Chronicle of the Bolshevik Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 504

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.