The Pageant of America: A Pictorial History of the United States - Vol. 1

By Clark Wissler; Constance Lindsay Skinner et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
SEARCH FOR THE WESTERN ROUTE

IN one and the same year, 1498, Vasco da Gama circumnavigated Africa and reached India, and Columbus discovered the South American continent blocking his path to that part of Asia where riches lay. Asia had been reached by the African route and its wealth had been sampled; but the African route was ten thousand miles long, and it was dangerous. Columbus believed that south of the limit of his explorations there was a passage beyond the American mainland. But the great dream of reaching the East by way of the West now stirred the hearts of venturesome seamen in other lands than Spain. It had, indeed, been the talk of seamen ever since Diaz had come home to tell of the eastern ocean beyond the "Cape of Storms." There were those who thought that a river flowed from China through this new continent of America; others believed that there was no continent but rather a group of very large islands, and that among these islands lay the passage which presently came to be spoken of as the Strait of Anian. Where lay this strait -- whether to the north or the south or, perhaps again, just to the west of the land found by Columbus -- no one knew. Its importance, however, none failed to grasp. The nation which should discover that strait and fortify it would be master of the world. Therein lay the motive of the struggle which followed, a struggle in which all gained -- England, Portugal, Spain, Holland, and France. Around this contest centers much of the early history of America. From it emerged two mighty continents, no longer mere barriers to the riches of the East, but a vast and far-flung arena where the colonial schemes of rival European powers were to clash for the next two hundred years.

212 The Student of Navigation, from Martin Cortés, Breve Compendio de la Sphera, Sevilla, 1556

-111-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Pageant of America: A Pictorial History of the United States - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 369

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.