The Pageant of America: A Pictorial History of the United States - Vol. 1

By Clark Wissler; Constance Lindsay Skinner et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVI
PIRATES AND PLANTERS OF THE WEST INDIES

BRITTSH colonial schemes were not confined to the continent of North America. As the seventeenth century opened, it seemed as though the eyes of western Europe were fixed on the West Indies. Through the Caribbean Sea passed the silver galleons of Spain and no one knew what wealth might be concealed in the ring of islands that fringed it. The Spanish stronghold was at Española, although the power of Spain had waned since the defeat of the Armada. English, Dutch and French slipped in under the lee of the Spanish base and buccaneering grew enormously.

Piracy had long made perilous the route of the Spanish treasure fleet through the sheltered Bahama channel. As English, Dutch and French strengthened their grip on the continental seaboard, opening ports where ships could be built and overhauled and where markets were provided, piracy increased. Where formerly a sea captain would have good hunting if he cut out a straggling galleon, now a doughty pirate might have a fleet of ten or twenty stout fighting ships under his command. His need, therefore, was for neighborly harbors and convenient supply stations. Logically, the Indies provided them.

In the middle of the seventeenth century, the heyday of piracy, the buccaneers numbered several thousand. They came from all ranks of life. Some of the hauls they made were staggering; one of the greatest was that of the Dutchman, Piet Heyn, who descended at Matanzas harbor with thirty-one sails and captured the Vera Cruz fleet with its cargo worth fifteen million dollars. In such an atmosphere the tiny colonies on some of the islands were founded.

But the British had a way of testing out the soil of the islands they visited. Jamestown was still young when British plantations appeared on Barbados and St. Kitts. Tobacco and sub-tropical products were raised at first but when, about 1640, sugar was introduced, the prosperity of buccaneering took second place to that of agriculture. Barbados rapidly became the colony in which, of all her brood, the mother country was most interested. Rich Barbados with its great plantations, its large population of whites and its larger population of slaves became a center of interest for commercial England.

As the seventeenth century grew old buccaneering waned, but sugar planting grew in importance. Her colonies in the West Indies became a corner-stone of Britain's growing commercial empire. If necessary, how much better could she afford to lose any one of the continental colonies than her sugar plantations which were found on islands from Jamaica around the arc of the Antilles almost to South America.

-276-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Pageant of America: A Pictorial History of the United States - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 369

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.