William Randolph Hearst: The Early Years, 1863-1910

By Ben Procter | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I owe a tremendous debt of gratitude to any number of people who helped this biography become a reality. Let me be specific. The starting point has to be the personnel at the Bancroft Library, especially the late director James D. Hart, Curator of Western Americana Bonnie Hardwick, Estelle Rebec, Richard Ogar, Franz Enciso, David Farrell, and Anthony Bliss. The staff members of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin were also extremely helpful, with Head Librarian Richard Oram and Ken Cravens deserving particular mention. And Dr. Martin Ridge of the Huntington Library, Judith Ann Schiff and Nicole Bouche (formerly at the Bancroft) of the Yale University Archives, Henry Rowen of the Rare Books Collection at Columbia, Archivist David Levesque of the Ohstram Library at St. Paul's, Archivist Metta Hake at the San Simeon Library, Ralph Gregory and Mrs. Mabel Reed of the Phoebe Apperson Hearst Historical Society of St. Clair, Missouri, and Dr. David Wigdor at the Manuscript Collection of the Library of Congress as well as the staffs at Harvard University Archives, Newberry Library, New York City Library, California State Library at Sacramento, Library of Congress manuscript and newspaper collections, and the TCU Library deserve special recognition and my thanks.

A number of individuals at Texas Christian University encouraged and abetted me, making life easier and bearable: Interlibrary Loan specialist Joyce Martindale, who suffered with me in hunting out books and newspapers and magazines from distant archives and libraries, and Sandy Peoples in Circulation, who kept me up-to-date on the numerous books checked out in my possession; Dr. Larry Adams, an associate vice chancellor for Academic Affairs, who aided my research by urging me to seek grants from the TCU Research Fund; Dr. Spencer Tucker, friend and colleague, who helped me acquire several necessary sabbaticals; Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs Bill Koehler who approved of my research and encouraged me to complete "the task"; and Dean of Arts and Sciences Michael McCracken, who claimed to be my "inspiration" or "conscience" by continually greeting me with the question, "Is the Hearst manuscript completed yet?"

-xiii-

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William Randolph Hearst: The Early Years, 1863-1910
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - The Romantic Legend of the Hearsts 1
  • 2 - The Rebel from California 11
  • 3 - The Newspaperman 37
  • 4 - Monarch of the Dallies 59
  • 5 - News War in New York 79
  • 6 - Yellow Journalism 95
  • 7 - The Journal's War 115
  • 8 - Political Activist 135
  • 9 - Running for President 163
  • 10 - Uncrowned Mayor of New York 193
  • 11 - Patron Saint of the Independents 229
  • Notes 265
  • Index 335
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