William Randolph Hearst: The Early Years, 1863-1910

By Ben Procter | Go to book overview

6
Yellow Journalism

As the United States progressed toward the twentieth century, a new spirit seemed to arise throughout the land, one of new identity, of confident optimism, at times of bellicose chauvinism. In 1893, historian Frederick Jackson Turner announced that Americans were uniquely different from all other peoples of the world. Through their efforts in conquering each succeeding American frontier from the Atlantic to the Pacific over the past three centuries, they had formulated democratic institutions and fashioned a way of life far superior to that of their European counterparts. They should therefore be justly proud of their history and traditions and accomplishments--and they were. Through the discovery and exploitation of such fabulous natural resources as oil and gas, coal and iron ore, gold and silver, the, United States had become the foremost industrial power in the world, surpassing both England and Germany. Five transcontinental railroads, their iron tentacles inextricably linking together the agrarian and urban areas of the nation, had created new markets and numerous jobs for a population nearing seventy-five million. And American ingenuity, as evidenced by the genius of Thomas Alva Edison and Alexander Graham Bell, seemed to illustrate the manifold blessings of a free society as well as the obvious advantages of a democratic system of government.

Many Americans in the 1890s also exuded a certain restless energy, an increasing appetite for challenge, together with a need to extend their growing pride of nationalism. And why? Possibly, young men had listened too longingly to romantic stories by Civil War veterans, who were enamored with the valor and heroism of individuals in battle, while overlooking the bloody slaughter of soldiers and the anguishing misery of defeat. Or, perhaps, with the Plains, Indians of the West and Southwest subdued by

-95-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
William Randolph Hearst: The Early Years, 1863-1910
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - The Romantic Legend of the Hearsts 1
  • 2 - The Rebel from California 11
  • 3 - The Newspaperman 37
  • 4 - Monarch of the Dallies 59
  • 5 - News War in New York 79
  • 6 - Yellow Journalism 95
  • 7 - The Journal's War 115
  • 8 - Political Activist 135
  • 9 - Running for President 163
  • 10 - Uncrowned Mayor of New York 193
  • 11 - Patron Saint of the Independents 229
  • Notes 265
  • Index 335
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 352

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.