Zen, Poetry, the Art of Lucien Stryk

By Susan Porterfield | Go to book overview

then she has come to respect him, and to recognize his early taunts as the valid response to her challenge, though she still does not consider herself his disciple, for she rejects entirely the concept of disciples: if a bottomless bucket precipitate a deeper experience, does one consider oneself the disciple of a bucket?

Eventually she described in detail her experience that afternoon. She had been disturbed on entering the building by the presence of a torii. This gateway to a Shinto shrine, symbolizing entrance onto sacred ground, seemed highly out of place to her, though Stryk was in no way responsible for it. Apparently she also resented the fact that Stryk had sought authorization for his translations, and it seems that the paradox of lecturing about Zen came home to her that day, though she was until recently a Zen lecturer herself. She admitted her identification and sensitivity on this point was very strong. Her mood at the lecture intensified and she said she was taken with the notion of going outside (it was a beautiful autumn day) and scooping up handfuls of leaves and scattering them around the room. Somehow she associated from the leaves outside to the pages of a book, and at that moment she got up, walked outside the room and bought a copy of Afterimages, Takahashi's book, which was on sale in conjunction with the lecture. It was an accident, she said, that she chose this particular book (two others were on sale), and an accident, as much as anything else that day was an accident, that Stryk started to read from that book just as she returned with it, and thus it was a synchronous accident that the book she tore up was the same book Stryk was reading from. Simple enough, perhaps, but by then nothing seemed very simple to me. Still, we had become friends, and I gave her a new copy of Takahashi's book.

American Poetry Review ( 1974)


Notes
1
Satori is the mystical illumination which is the object of Zen. In most Zen stories satori is obtained by accident: a pile of logs falls as the student walks past them, the bottom drops out of his bucket, he looks into the bottom of a bowl and sees it is empty. And even the stories about satori brought on by masters have an accidental quality. For example: There was a master who raised one finger each time he mentioned God. One day a student, in jest, raised his own finger in front of the master and the teacher drew his sword and cut his finger off. As the student rose to go the master followed and struck him on the back, and when the startled student turned around the teacher raised one finger in his face, and the student achieved satori.
2
Gassho is a traditional religious salutation that signifies respect for the Buddha Nature of the person saluted.
3
A koan is a type of paradoxical question used by the Rinzai sect of Zen to induce the disci-

-215-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Zen, Poetry, the Art of Lucien Stryk
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vi
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Preface x
  • Introduction 1
  • The American Scene Versus the International Scene 15
  • I. Lucien Stryk on Poems Ana Poetry 23
  • Making Poems 25
  • What? Why This. This Only 41
  • A World Language of Poetry? 48
  • Note on Translating Japanese Zen Poetry 51
  • Verse: Free and Otherwise 53
  • The Future of Poetry 55
  • Beyond Poetry 57
  • The Red Rug: An Introduction to Poetry 60
  • Lucien Stryk: An Interview 76
  • Ii. Lucien Stryk on Zen 97
  • Let the Spring Breeze Enter: the Quest of Zen 99
  • Beginnings, Ends 106
  • Zen Poetry 117
  • Painter and Poet 134
  • Shinkichi Takahashi: Contemporary Zen Poet 144
  • Death of a Zen Poet: Shinkichi Takahashi (1901-1987) 156
  • I Fear Nothing: A Note on the Zen Poetry of Death 166
  • Buddhism and Modern Man 176
  • Poetry and Zen 196
  • The Sound of Tearing/ the Destroyer of Books 211
  • Notes 215
  • Introduction to Encounter with Zen 217
  • Introduction to on Love and Barley: Haiku of Basho 223
  • Preface to Crow with No Mouth: Ikkyu 233
  • Introduction to the Dumpling Field: Haiku of Issa 240
  • Modern Japanese Haiku 251
  • Encounter with Lucien Stryk 269
  • III - On the Poet 277
  • Lucien Sfryk's Poetry 279
  • Notes 291
  • Earning the Language: the Writing of Lucien Stryk 293
  • From "Zen: the Rocks of Sesshu" to "Triumph of the Sparrow 314
  • Notes 337
  • Translating Lucien Stryk 341
  • Iv Selected Poetry of Lucien Stryk 345
  • Books by Lucien Stryk 387
  • Works Cited 388
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 388

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.