Decade of Disillusionment: The Kennedy-Johnson Years

By Jim F. Heath | Go to book overview

V
The Unfulfilled
Promise

AT THE time, the Kennedy administration's policies in Vietnam commanded no consuming public interest. Never during the New Frontier did the Vietnamese conflict provoke riots or demonstrations. The news media argued only about the methods of conducting the war, not about the basic commitment. The consensus supporting the government's efforts to check Communism continued to be strong and healthy with only a modest fraying around the edges, and although the situation in Southeast Asia was exasperating, it was never Kennedy's number-one problem. In fact, during his last months in office, legislative matters occupied his time far more than Vietnam. And while the verdict was not in before his death, there were signs that for the first time since his early days in the White House, Kennedy was gradually regaining the initiative in his relations with Congress.

He had begun his administration by submitting an ambitious legislative program, which included, with the glaring exception of a civil rights proposal, the bulk of the Democrats' 1960 campaign promises. On the surface, his legislative record during his first two years looked impressive. Congress, Sorensen boasted, "enacted four-fifths of Kennedy's program." Measuring the administration's success with Congress by pointing to the high percentage of the President's total requests passed was deceiving, however. It gave equal weight to both minor and major proposals and included foreign policy legislation--normally much less partisan in nature--as well as domestic requests. Furthermore, some acts remained the chief

-143-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Decade of Disillusionment: The Kennedy-Johnson Years
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xv
  • I - Introduction 1
  • II - The Torch Is Passed 14
  • III - Opening the New Frontier 49
  • IV - Ambivalence and Action 94
  • V - The Unfulfilled Promise 143
  • VI - Transition to the Great Society 164
  • VII - The Years of Triumph 195
  • VIII - The Years of Frustration 238
  • IX - The Legacies of Disillusionment 290
  • Bibliography 304
  • Index 321
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 334

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.