Decade of Disillusionment: The Kennedy-Johnson Years

By Jim F. Heath | Go to book overview

Bibliography

THE COLLECTIONS at the Kennedy and Johnson presidential libraries are indispensable sources of information about the respective presidential administrations. The Kennedy Library is temporarily located in the Federal Reserve Records Center at Waltham, Massachusetts, but will eventually occupy its own facility at Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Johnson Library is housed in a large and impressive new building on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin. Although only a relatively small number of the millions of papers held by both institutions were available for research when I visited them, additional collections are opened yearly. Both libraries are pursuing oral-history projects aggressively, and transcriptions of interviews with key administration and public figures provide a rich vein of information for scholars.

The published material about the sixties and about the two Democratic administrations is already voluminous. The list given here is by no means comprehensive but rather cites the works I found most valuable.

Two good general histories of the decade are available: William L. O'Neill , Coming Apart. An Informal History of America in the 1960's ( 1971) is opinionated, provocative, and a pleasure to read; David Burner, Robert D. Marcus , and Thomas R. West, A Giant's Strength:America in the 1960's ( 1971) is a briefer, judicious, and balanced appraisal. Ronald Berman, America in the Sixties ( 1968) is an important early intellectual history of the decade. Ronald Lora, ed., America in the '60s:Cultural Authorities in Transition ( 1974) provides a useful collection of essays and documents on social-cultural change. See especially Lora's thoughtful and succinct introduction. Other anthologies of value include Edward Quinn and Paul J. Dolan , eds., The Sense of the Sixties ( 1968); Peter Joseph, Good Times:An Oral History of America in the Nineteen Sixties ( 1973); and Herbert Mitgang, ed., America at Random ( 1970). John Brooks, The Great Leap ( 1966) is a useful account of how America changed between 1939 and 1964. For statistical information about the sixties, the annual edition of the official Statistical Abstract of the United States is invaluable.

On Kennedy before his election to the White House, by far the best study is James MacGregor Burns, Kennedy:A Political Profile ( 1960), a penetrating appraisal by a political scientist. For information about the Kennedy family Richard J. Whalen, The Founding Father: Joseph KennedyThe Story ofJoseph Kennedy

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Decade of Disillusionment: The Kennedy-Johnson Years
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xv
  • I - Introduction 1
  • II - The Torch Is Passed 14
  • III - Opening the New Frontier 49
  • IV - Ambivalence and Action 94
  • V - The Unfulfilled Promise 143
  • VI - Transition to the Great Society 164
  • VII - The Years of Triumph 195
  • VIII - The Years of Frustration 238
  • IX - The Legacies of Disillusionment 290
  • Bibliography 304
  • Index 321
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