The WPA and Federal Relief Policy

By Donald S. Howard | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII
ELIGIBILITY: POLITICS, CITIZENSHIP, AND SUBVERSIVE ACTIVITY

POLITICS

ALL THAT IS SAID in law and WPA regulations about discrimination against applicants for WPA jobs on the basis of color, race, and creed also holds for discrimination because of politics. In fact, restrictions upon political discrimination are prescribed in even greater detail than those upon discrimination on other grounds, which in many instances appear to be thought of as secondary and merely incidental to the one great bugaboo of Congress and the administration--politics.1


"Political Pull" an Elusive Force

The extent to which politics has or has not played a part in placing workers on WPA jobs is, by its very nature, most difficult accurately to appraise. In the first place, it is no easy task to define what is meant by politics. When a worker is referred to a relief agency or the WPA for a WPA job how are "political" referrals to be distinguished from those which social workers even in private social agencies have long been accustomed to receive from influential board members, prominent local leaders, or even politicians? Social workers who have had experience with private social agencies as well as with the WPA program have frequently emphasized the fact that the "politics" and personal influence of board members and prominent citizens in connection with getting benefits from private agencies are frequently more difficult to combat than those experienced under the WPA program because in private agencies there are no safeguards com

____________________
1
Restrictions on political activity are not limited to favoritism or discrimination in giving out WPA jobs but apply also to the treatment of those already employed by the WPA. Some safeguards, such as the letters which have been sent all workers with their pay checks from time to time (or have been posted on project sites), have assured workers again and again that they could vote as they pleased and that how they voted could have no effect on their WPA employment. For a typical example of such letters and notices see WPA Release 4-2124, April 22, 1940. See also chap. 30.

-299-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The WPA and Federal Relief Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 879

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.