London Life in the XVIIIth Century

By M. Dorothy George | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
LONDON IMMIGRANTS AND EMIGRANTS

When a man is tired of London he is tired of Life."--JOHNSON ( 1777).

THE framework of English society was in the eighteenth century still largely based on the ideal of a population which moved about as little as possible. The poor laws and the vagrancy laws provided for sending the wanderer back to his place of settlement. Corporate towns aimed at excluding new-comers from exercising trades or handicrafts. It became the object however of parish officers to keep down the number of inhabitants with settlements, cottages were pulled down and marriages discouraged, children were apprenticed in some other parish. Thus the result of the settlement laws was not to check movement but to encourage it. People dislodged in the country went to towns, especially to London and the growing industrial districts; it was impossible for large urban parishes to protect themselves after the manner of country villages. This was soon realised in London and a proposal was made to stop immigration by the old policy of forbidding new buildings. This was a subject of debate in Parliament in 1675: "We are undone in the country without buildings; the relief of the poor ruins the nation. By a late Act they are hunted like foxes out of parishes, and whither must they go but where there are buildings?". . . "The Act for settlement of the poor does indeed thrust all people out of the country to London. This Bill remedies the matter."1

London needed a large supply of immigrants to make up the ravages of her heavy death-rate. There was also a constant emigration that had to be counterbalanced; London was said to be the best recruiting ground in the kingdom for the army and the plantations owing to the many country people who came to seek employment which they failed to find.2 The successful citizen retired to his villa in the suburbs or bought an estate in the country. Many parish children

-109-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
London Life in the XVIIIth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 452

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.