San Francisco's Literary Frontier

By Franklin Dickerson Walker | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII
POLITE LITERATURE AND GHOSTS

DURING the mid-sixties San Francisco celebrated the winning of the Civil War and mourned the assassination of Lincoln; it was shaken physically by the earthquake of '65 and financially by the panic on the Comstock; it built a stock exchange and inaugurated the Pacific Mail for trade with the Orient. And as the rails crept west from Omaha and climbed east from Sacramento, the end of the frontier came closer day by day.

San Francisco continued to grow in population and wealth in spite of temporary set-backs. When Nevada silver slumped in '64, stocks which had been selling for as high as two thousand dollars became worthless and the entire mining investment in Virginia City fell to an evaluation of only five millions. To balance the decline in mineral output, however, four generous, wet winters followed the pinching droughts of the early sixties, making a major wheat-producing area of the San Joaquin Valley. Merchandise exports swelled to fifteen millions in 1865, to seventeen millions in 1866. In the same year the Comstock Lode again took on life and moved towards a second bonanza. Realtors anticipated the completion of the railroad by selling property at boom prices to the greatest annual influx of newcomers that the city had ever seen.

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San Francisco's Literary Frontier
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Good Books about the Pacific Coast *
  • Title Page i
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter I- A Precocious Frontier 3
  • Chapter II- The Fifties 17
  • Chapter III- ɣ Apprentice Days 55
  • Chapter IV- Washoe Silver and the Civil War 89
  • Chapter V- The Golden Era 116
  • Chapter VI- U+263 Visitors 146
  • Chapter VII- Polite Literature and Ghosts 176
  • Chapter VIII- A Rash of Poetry 207
  • Chapter IX- The Town Crier 237
  • Chapter X- The Overland Monthly 256
  • Chapter XI - Practical Literature 284
  • Chapter XII- From Gold Gulch to Parnassus 316
  • Chapter XIII- Epilogue 351
  • Bibliography 363
  • Notes and References 371
  • Index i
  • A Note on the Type in Which This Book is Set *
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