England and Germany, 1740-1914

By Bernadotte Everly Schmitt | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
MODERN ENGLAND

IT will be readily admitted, even by those to whom the fact is unpalatable, that since the end of the Napoleonic wars England has been the dominant nation of the world, and that her participation in the Great War will probably be the decisive factor in its length, if not in its termination. Why should so commanding a position belong to a couple of islands whose population was less than that of France (until a few years ago), Germany, Austria-Hungary, or Russia? For none of these nations has accepted British hegemony as a law of the universe. The answer is to be found in the accidents of history and geography, with which must be reckoned certain traits of character that are the product of free institutions and a peculiar consciousness of national unity.

First of all, at the end of the eighteenth century a series of remarkable inventions, for which English genius must receive full credit, transformed England from an agricultural into an industrial country and vastly stimulated its already thriving commerce. By chance this revamping of the national life coincided with the French Revolution and the first Napoleonic Empire, a period during which the continent of Europe was devastated by a succession of wars and thereby prevented from imitating the new English system. Though England was an active and the most steadfast participant in the long struggle to crush Napoleon, her territory was not invaded, and her sea power enabled her at once to destroy the foreign trade of the Napoleonic states and to establish her own monopoly in the Americas

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England and Germany, 1740-1914
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter I - Introduction 1
  • Chapter II - Modern England 12
  • Chapter IV - German Expansion 70
  • Chapter V - Commercial Rivalry 96
  • Chapter VI - Anglo-German Relations to 1890 116
  • Chapter VII - The Quarrel 139
  • Chapter VIII - The Admiralty of the Atlantic 173
  • Chapter IX - The Triple Entente 219
  • Chapter X - The Near East 253
  • Chapter XI - Agadir and Its Aftermath 302
  • Chapter XII - The Eve of the War 358
  • Chapter XIII - The Crisis of 19141 394
  • Hapter XIV - Armageddon 435
  • Chapter XV - The Anglo-German Rupture 468
  • Appendix 499
  • Index 507
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