England and Germany, 1740-1914

By Bernadotte Everly Schmitt | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII
THE EVE OF THE WAR

THE European war of 1914 was the direct result of the Balkan conflagration of 1912-13. For thirty-five years the Ottoman Empire had been a potent cause of international rivalry, for its ultimate collapse was confidently expected, and the inability of the Great Powers to devise a satisfactory partition had operated as an incentive to ambitious and mischievous diplomacy. For a brief interval the Young Turk revolution promised to relieve Europe of its insoluble problem. Such anticipations, however, were not realized, partly because the Young Turks soon became the instruments of German designs, partly because their handling of the Balkan situation revived the unrest latent among the Christian populations. For the latter resented the policy of Turkification adopted by Constantinople in the supposed interest of military efficiency and, suppressing their racial animosities, began to make common cause against the Young Turk régime ( February, 1912). It became apparent that only an effective measure of decentralization would prevent the reopening of the Macedonian question, and this was not forthcoming. In August, 1912, therefore, Count Berchtold suggested an exchange of views between the Powers.

If intended to stem chauvinistic tendencies, its effect was to render war inevitable. For in the spring of the year, the four Balkan kingdoms,--Bulgaria, Greece, Serbia, and Montenegro,--weary of the constant disturbances in Macedonia, formed an alliance to drive the Turk out of

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England and Germany, 1740-1914
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter I - Introduction 1
  • Chapter II - Modern England 12
  • Chapter IV - German Expansion 70
  • Chapter V - Commercial Rivalry 96
  • Chapter VI - Anglo-German Relations to 1890 116
  • Chapter VII - The Quarrel 139
  • Chapter VIII - The Admiralty of the Atlantic 173
  • Chapter IX - The Triple Entente 219
  • Chapter X - The Near East 253
  • Chapter XI - Agadir and Its Aftermath 302
  • Chapter XII - The Eve of the War 358
  • Chapter XIII - The Crisis of 19141 394
  • Hapter XIV - Armageddon 435
  • Chapter XV - The Anglo-German Rupture 468
  • Appendix 499
  • Index 507
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