Studies in the Literary Backgrounds of English Radicalism: With Special Reference to the French Revolution

By M. Ray Adams | Go to book overview

PREFACE

THIS book is a collection of studies intended to supplement the labors of other scholars in the backgrounds of the English Romantic Movement considered particularly in its revolutionary aspects. No one of the writers who are dealt with in detail has ever been treated with the thoroughness he deserves from the point of view taken here. The choice of each of them has been determined largely by the neglect that has been accorded him. Of such women as Mary Wollstonecraft and such men as Godwin, Paine, Holcroft, Thelwall, and the youthful romantic poets of the 1790's I have foregone details per se, for behold are they not written in many books of which the scholarly reader has a comparatively ready knowledge.

These are literary rather than political or social or historical studies. I have directed my inquiries not primarily towards facts themselves but towards the impact of facts upon the human spirit, or rather towards such expressions of this impact as transmute dead fact into quick thought and turn writing into literature. I have not applied the historical method to the treatment of my material. I have attempted no synthesis of the political or economic ideas of the revolutionary period. The stress has been thrown upon personalities rather than upon movements as such, upon the interpenetration of subject matter and personality rather than upon subject matter itself. My principal object has been to fill in a portion of the background of the great revolutionary writings of the period.

My indebtedness to the great body of writing and research on the French Revolution in relation to England is fully indicated specifically in the notes, and generally in the bibliography. I am under many obligations to the

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Studies in the Literary Backgrounds of English Radicalism: With Special Reference to the French Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 334

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.