The Superpollsters: How They Measure and Manipulate Public Opinion in America

By David W. Moore | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

My sincere appreciation to all of the people who agreed to be interviewed for both the original and revised editions of this book. They include: Jeff Alderman, Janice Ballou, Nancy Belden, Jim Beninger, John Brennan, David Broder, Creeley Buchanan, Pat Caddell, Mark DiCamillo, Mervin Field, Kathleen Frankovic, Goeffrey Garin, David Gergen, Jack Germond, Stanley Greenberg, Louis Harris, Irwin "Tubby" Harrison, Peter Hart, Shere Hite, Rich Jaroslavsky, Kenneth John, Michael Kagay, Mary Klette, Gladys Lang, Frank Luntz, Dotty Lynch, Corona Machemer, Elizabeth Martin, Warren Mitofsky, Richard Morin, Dwight Morris, Michael O'Neil, Gary Orren, Susan Pinkus, Howard Schuman, Eleanor Singer, Tom Smith, Scott Taylor, Robert Teeter, Charles Turner, Joseph Waksberg, and Richard Wirthlin. My thanks also to Howard Schuman, Janice Ballou, and Michael Kagay, who each read parts of the manuscript and made some very helpful suggestions.

The University of New Hampshire provided an especially supportive environment for this work. In this regard, three colleagues / administrators were especially helpful: Robert Craig, Stuart Palmer, and James Morrison. Students and colleagues were also generous with their thoughtful comments. A faculty committee gave me a semester free from teaching under the University's Faculty Scholar Award program, which was crucial to my completing the original edition of this book in a timely fashion.

David Sheaves of the Institute for Research in Social Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was very helpful by providing information about the polls and poll reports of Louis Harris that are archived at IRSS. Elizabeth Knappman has been an especially helpful and encouraging literary agent, who made some

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The Superpollsters: How They Measure and Manipulate Public Opinion in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - The Sins Of Shere Hite 1
  • 2 - America Speaks 31
  • 3 - Reinventing The Industry 73
  • 4 - The Democratic Presidential Pollsters 125
  • 5 - The Republican Presidential Pollsters 193
  • 6 - The Media Pollsters 249
  • 7 - The California Divide 301
  • 8 - The Elusive Pulse Of Democracy 325
  • 9 - Polling And Politics in The Nineties 359
  • Notes 397
  • Index 419
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