The Earlier Tudors, 1485-1558

By J. D. Mackie | Go to book overview

CONTENTS
CHAPTER I. THE NEW MONARCHY
The Renaissance not an event but a process1
Rebellion of the facts against the theories2
Medieval theories3
An active spirit of criticism4
The Prince of the new monarchy5
The new monarchy not a breach in constitutional development6
Contemporaries unconscious of any remarkable change7
The importance of the Battle of Bosworth8
The decision, though not the end, of a futile civil war10
The prestige of the Crown survived the internecine struggle12
Decline of the nobility13
Unstable basis of baronial power: lack of money15
Lavish expenditure of the fifth earl of Northumberland17
A shaken morality18
The position of the Church: the appearance of strength19
Understanding between Crown and Papacy20
Power of the Church sapped by indifference 21
Public apathy gave opportunity for a competent king22
The Tudor brought no theory; his success a triumph of fact23

CHAPTER II. THE FACE OF ENGLAND
'Descriptions' borrowed from Higden's Polychronicon25
England as seen by foreigners: Erasmus26
Polydore Vergil27
Polydore's description of England28
The Italian Relation: a description by a Venetian30
Descriptions by Englishmen: John Leland32
His professed purpose to rescue English manuscripts32
His suspicion of Polydore and of German 'collectors'33
His detailed survey of much of England34
The English forests34
Communications: roads and bridges35
Champaign farming and mineral wealth36
Few scars left by the Civil War37
Decay of the castles38
The contribution of the church to building39
Country towns and ports40
London41
London Bridge42
The city and its buildings43
The suburbs and the fields: Westminster44

-vii-

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The Earlier Tudors, 1485-1558
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Maps xxii
  • I- The New Monarchy 1
  • II - The Face of England 25
  • III - The New King and His Rivals 46
  • IV - Foreign Policy 81
  • V - Perkin Warbeck 112
  • VI - Foreign Affairs 151
  • VII - The Achievement of Henry VII 189
  • VIII - Splendour of Youth 231
  • IX - The Cardinal 286
  • X - Royal Supremacy 335
  • XI - The Fall of the Monasteries 370
  • XII - Imperium Merum 402
  • XIII - Economic Development 444
  • XIV - The Young Josiah 478
  • XV - The Reign of Mary 526
  • XVI - The Achievement of the Age 562
  • Appendix - Tudor Coinage from Henry Vii. To Elizabeth 604
  • Bibliography 609
  • List of Holders of Offices 645
  • Key to Genealogical Table I 655
  • Index 659
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