(Dis)Entitling the Poor: The Warren Court, Welfare Rights, and the American Political Tradition

By Elizabeth Bussiere | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

It is impossible to acknowledge all the people who have influenced my ideas or whose good company was especially beneficial when I hit an impasse in my work. But I trust that through face-to-face conversations or through letters, phone calls, and e-mail those people whose names do not appear here nevertheless understand the depth of my gratitude.

For their indispensable feedback dating back to drafts of dissertation proposals, Jeffrey B. Abramson, Jennifer L. Hochschild, and R. Shep Melnick deserve my deepest appreciation. They were sharp when I was muddled and kind when kindness mattered more than intellectual acumen. A measure of their grace as mentors is the room they have since created in our relationships for intellectual parity and friendship. In addition, I am grateful to Michael W. McCann, for although I fell short of his own high scholarly standards, his meticulous and insightful reader's reports enabled me to formulate my arguments with greater precision, persuasiveness, or punch. Bob Pepperman Taylor gave generously of his time and talent on an earlier version of the manuscript so that I might one day see it in print. Daniel A. Cohen helped me frame the book and keep the narrative and analytic lines in focus. His companionship has become equally valuable.

Other scholars and friends assisted on a variety of tasks. Even though I was a complete stranger, Rogers Smith gave me extensive comments on what subsequently became Chapters 5-7. Sidney Milkis's knowledge of American political development was especially illuminating as I reflected on the material for Chapters 4 and 8. And although I have not done justice to their complex and subtle ideas, Nancy J. Hirschmann and Elizabeth Wingrove each enriched my understanding of feminist theory, in addition to providing muchneeded solace. Arthur (Rusty) Simonds and Kathe McCaffrey regularly welcomed me into their home and somehow managed to whip up veritable feasts while simultaneously tending to my intellectual or computer glitches. Marilyn Stelting helped prepare the manuscript for submission and became a good friend in the process.

-ix-

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